7 Ways to Get More People to Trust Your Content

7 Ways to Get More People to Trust Your Content

Remember: Your business is out to solve a problem, which should be your thesis when you're deciding on topics to contribute. In coming up with those topics, ask yourself what are the common issues in your industry. Overall, your task is figuring out how your brand can produce quality content rather than doing the same thing everyone else is doing. Believe it or not, people tend to trust blogs as a primary source of information; in fact, blogs are in third place for trustworthiness, after family and friends. Out of the surveyed group, 91 percent were promoting their efforts on social media, as well, and 62 percent said they believed that promoting their content to LinkedIn was working, while 50 percent considered Twitter an effective means as well. As mentioned earlier, posting about common topics can be useful if you're contributing to a larger conversation, but churning out trite content will cheapen your brand. As digital agency Huge has pointed out, building this trust takes quite a bit of time, but should be one of the primary goals of your content. Remember the beliefs you have in common with your customers (the mission you share), and be consistent with them. Continue the conversation on social media. One of the biggest things that you can do to build trust in your content and your brand is engage directly with your audience on social media.

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7 Ways to Get More People to Trust Your Content

Any time we hop on our phones or laptops, we just might feel that the glut of content there is suffocating us. How does that happen?

Google the terms “how to,” “what is” or even “social media marketing,” and watch as your screen is flooded with lists and anecdotes from a variety of sources. While not all of this content is bad, it’s hard to know how much of it to trust.

Granted, inaccurate information isn’t always the fault of the writer: The internet changes so quickly that source links may become extinct; or there may have been a misinterpretation of complex statistics or research.

However, if you’re putting content out there for your own business that you hope will build trust with your audience, you need to start doing more thorough fact-checking than your competitors are. The point is about more than just gaining traffic; it’s about building a relationship with your customers,

If you follow these steps, that relationship potentially could last a lifetime.

1. Focus on solving problems first, and getting visitors second.

One of the biggest things that people miss the mark on with their content is that they worry about attracting visitors and neglect to provide value to them.

After all, the goal isn’t just to have them find you; you want to keep them coming back. Remember: Your business is out to solve a problem, which should be your thesis when you’re deciding on topics to contribute.

In coming up with those topics, ask yourself what are the common issues in your industry. If you’re looking for inspiration, it’s not a bad idea to run a test on Google Trends, just to double-check that what you’re thinking about writing hasn’t already prompted oversaturated coverage.

For example, if you’re an artificial intellitence company that helps fashion brands with sales, then a prospective article titled “What Is AI?” has most likely already been published 1,000 times. But . . . “How AI Is Changing the Fashion Industry” is probably going to gain you considerable traffic.

Overall, your task is figuring out how your brand can produce quality content rather than doing the same thing everyone else is doing.

2. Emphasize quality over quantity.

While producing a high volume of content might be a good strategy to up your SEO results, it can damage the trust people place in your blog. Believe it or not, people tend to trust blogs as a primary source of information; in fact, blogs are in third place for trustworthiness, after family and friends.

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