The Biggest Misconception About Being Creative (And How To Find Your Personal Inspiration)

The Biggest Misconception About Being Creative (And How To Find Your Personal Inspiration)

Are you creative? It’s time to rethink creativity Somewhere down the line, the term a creative reared its arrogant head and began to monopolize the definition of creativity, devaluing the facets of creative-thinking that don’t result in a visual or conceptual output. It’s time to commonly accept that we can generate creative responses that aren’t visual. Yet the separatism of the creatives shouldn’t just be understood as a response to the rise of new technologies. Yet conceptual thinking isn’t unique to creatives. And being creative isn’t an exclusive right held by a small group of quaffed often-frilly thinkers. Thinking loosely around a given situation to develop the most impactful solution. Meaning they have the best brand and industry knowledge, and the best insights into the situation on hand. Otherwise, they’re not good ideas, they’re just ideas. And for people who are not in the role of a creative to feel confident that their ideas and insights are worthwhile and that they will be listened to.

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The Biggest Misconception About Being Creative (And How To Find Your Personal Inspiration)

Ask yourself two questions:

Are you a creative?

Are you creative?

Answering no to the first question shouldn’t mean you can’t answer yes to the second.

Nonetheless, in our industry, and the wider world, the word “creative” has changed its meaning. From a certain way of thinking to the job title of an exclusive club.

The misconception is that you are only a creative if you can draw, write copy, or produce something visual using Creative Suite. Or perhaps because you sit in a trendy café in front of your Mac, nursing a coffee and eating smashed avocado.

Yet there is a huge difference between being a creative and being creative.

Being a creative simply means you’re making a living from a visual or conceptual aspect of your creativity. Yet other job roles demand just as much creative spark. Even if the job titles don’t let on.

It’s time to rethink creativity

Somewhere down the line, the term a creative reared its arrogant head and began to monopolize the definition of creativity, devaluing the facets of creative-thinking that don’t result in a visual or conceptual output.

So take a moment and rethink creativity.

  • What is creative thinking?
  • What isn’t it?
  • What does it mean to approach something creatively?
  • What does the creative process demand of you as a creative thinker?
  • And at its best, what can this process achieve?

Scrap your long-held definition and build one anew. If you’re open to it. It might just change the way you think, the way you work and the results you can generate.

Being creative - image 1
What is creativity?

At its heart, creativity is about problem-solving and lateral thinking.

Some of the most creative thinkers are those using Excel and PowerPoint to reach creative solutions, rather than Photoshop or Cinema 4D.

Here’s an example. Andy Dufresne in The Shawshank Redemption. Tell me that guy isn’t creative! Or Russel Crowe in A Beautiful Mind? And he’s not drawing storyboards.

It’s time for a broader understanding of what it means to be professionally creative. It’s time to commonly accept that we can generate creative responses that aren’t visual. It’s time to give everyone their creativity back.

The commoditization of creativity

Not everyone is fulfilled by being a creative. For many people, it’s just not all that. Yet the commoditization of creativity is entirely understandable.

It’s a very human thing to value the idea of being unique. Of being able to bring something unique to a given situation. And there are many unique forms of creativity.

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