10 Ways to Save Time in Creating Content

I used to waste a tremendous amount of time creating, producing, promoting, and distributing content. We all want to create the content that our audience wants the most. Start with your analytics and look at what topics are working best right now. When the time comes to write a new piece, refer to your calendar, grab the topic, and start writing. Block out time each day to write and only write in that window. I use so many apps to keep track of projects at the office – analytics, email, social media, events – that if I don’t shut them down while I produce content, I’d never get it done. Little tasks like checking social media and replying to emails trick the brain into feeling like you accomplished something when in reality all you’ve done is waste time. Once I’m locked onto a topic, here’s what I often do to get the content flowing: Create a social post to promote the core idea of the article. Create a process you can repeat every time your content is complete. Conclusion No matter how you approach content marketing, there’s always a way to improve the process and trim the time spent to create polished content.

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As a content creator, you’re aware of the arduous task of getting a single piece completed. Audience research, topic sourcing, planning, collaboration, editing and revisions, and sourcing authoritative data to back up ideas, etc., are time-intensive tasks.

I used to waste a tremendous amount of time creating, producing, promoting, and distributing content. Then I set out to optimize the process, while also working to improve the response from my audiences. Here are 10 tips I learned along the way.

1. Streamline research

The research phase can eat up a ridiculous amount of time if you’re not careful. We all want to create the content that our audience wants the most. It can leave you leaping back and forth on topic ideas as you try to decide exactly what your audience wants at any given time. Even with a strong understanding of your audience, you might feel lost in finding new topics.

Streamline this process and eliminate the concern.

  • Start with your analytics and look at what topics are working best right now.
  • Look at your competitors and review the content their fans are engaging with.
  • Check BuzzSumo against your best-performing topics and target keywords.

Grow ideas from the best-performing content across the board.

2. Compile multiple ideas at one time

Don’t make the mistake of forcing yourself to come up with a topic on the day you’re to write it; plan far in advance.

At least a month in advance, plot all the best content ideas (based on what you learned in the first tip) on your editorial or content calendar. If a topic is inspired by multiple sources, make sure you list those contacts for possible citations in the idea stage. When the time comes to write a new piece, refer to your calendar, grab the topic, and start writing.

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3. Cut back on quantity

Businesses that regularly publish on their blog see 67% more leads from their inbound efforts over companies that don’t. That doesn’t mean you need to hammer out volumes of content every day.

I’m on board with the 10x content formula. I’ve reduced frequency in favor of writing long-form content with far more value (10 times) for the reader. These pieces take a bit longer to produce, but they’re far more comprehensive and have a massive impact on authority.

Fill in the long-form content gaps with bite-sized content formats, including:

4. Schedule writing time

If you don’t schedule time to write, you’ll never get around to it or you’ll scramble to meet a deadline. Block out time each day to write and only write in that window. Don’t let other activities lead you to cancel your writing time or to reschedule it.

My own schedule is so packed during the week that I schedule writing time on the weekends. After my morning workout and breakfast, I write in 30-minute blocks with five- to 10-minute breaks to disengage and keep my focus sharp.

5. Set goals

Scheduling time is only the first step in the writing production process. Next, set goals around what you…

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