3 Content Marketing Strategy Reminders That Lurk in a Surprising Place

3 Content Marketing Strategy Reminders That Lurk in a Surprising Place

“To be successful, we need to remove what’s in our way of doing the great things,” Joe says. If you’re lucky, your chosen distraction may refresh your perspective on the great things you’re working on to achieve your goals. Marketing advice in a Netflix show? Here’s what watching the hosts create experiences for their guests reminded me about the strategy behind creating content experiences for our guests (think: audiences). Content marketers looking for better results. It’s hardly a coincidence that the best of the episodes I watched featured an owner with the most meaningful purpose and goals. It may have been the echo of another line from Joe’s Content Marketing World talk: Strategy is all about choosing. Since this is a renovation show, the answer is often great design. In an episode featuring a run-down Malibu property, the redesign focused on the property’s enormous beachfront deck. Sharpen your hosting skills A great host can make a great experience.

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Did you catch Joe Pulizzi’s talk at Content Marketing World 2018? In it, he revealed the secrets of life and marketing (sorry if you missed it).

I won’t give everything away here, but I will let you in on one of the (no longer secret) secrets: Cut everything from your day that doesn’t get you to your goal.

“To be successful, we need to remove what’s in our way of doing the great things,” Joe says. “We have to clear away all the distractions.”

It’s great advice. And, as Joe notes, it serves people like Bill Gates and Warren Buffett well.

Of course, mere mortals can’t necessarily cut out everythingthat doesn’t get them to their big goals. Many of us need to do less than great but still necessary things, like folding a mountain of laundry or reorganizing an overstuffed junk drawer. And sometimes distractions actually help us through those earthbound tasks.

If you’re lucky, your chosen distraction may refresh your perspective on the great things you’re working on to achieve your goals.

That happened to me recently when I fired up Netflix looking for some inspiration to help me through my household chores. I found a set of surprisingly good marketing reminders embedded in Stay Here, a rental-home renovation show.

Marketing advice in a Netflix show?

The binge-able Stay Here isn’t overtly about content marketing, although it does offer a few basic tips (think: blogging helps, headlines matter). But there are things to learn. Both hosts, designer Genevieve Gorder and real estate expert Peter Lorimer, demonstrate and encourage something most content marketers value – empathy.

Genevieve and Peter teach short-term rental owners (think: Airbnb hosts) how to improve their results by creating an incredible experience for their visitors by:

That’s what we’re all trying to do with our content, right?

Here’s what watching the hosts create experiences for their guests reminded me about the strategy behind creating content experiences for our guests (think: audiences).

1. Meaningful goals matter

Each episode includes a discussion of the business and marketing plan for the property.

The first step? A review of the owner’s purpose and goals.

Who else should start with a review of goals? Content marketers looking for better results.

It’s hardly a coincidence that the best of the episodes I watched featured an owner with the most meaningful purpose and goals.

Gordy operates the Yellow Block Bed and Breakfast in Brooklyn, New York, and wants to make more money from his property. Although I didn’t watch every episode, I feel confident every owner on the show shares that perfectly fine business goal.

But Gordy’s purpose is where the meaning comes in. For one thing, he’s operating the rental to save money for his three sons’ education. For another, he’s committed to improving the bed and breakfast without charging more. As he explains on the show, “This is a working-class community. We want working-class folks from all over the world to come and enjoy it and live…

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