5 Companies Creating Purposeful & Engaging HR Content

5 Companies Creating Purposeful & Engaging HR Content

As you were researching, which companies looked like great places to work? Companies create HR content to attract capable new hires with great resumes, and those same assets can be leveraged to keep employees happy during their tenure. Here are five companies that have figured out how to blend culture, messaging, and human resources. Through content, of course. Microsoft Life, the company’s hub for HR-related content, posts video interviews with employees, outlines internal initiatives, offers resources like a guide to LGBT allyship at work, and publishes features like “Engineering training for women, by women.” Washington University in St. Louis Colleges and universities are typically effective at content marketing because they have a deep well of stories to draw from that don’t have to include explicit promotion for the school. Pepsico Jobs Pepsico has an entire social media channel dedicated to prospective employees. The jobs Twitter account regularly posts spotlight content on employees and “how it’s made” style videos. For the finishing touch, the account often retweets CEO Indra Nooyi as she blogs and visits company offices around the world. pic.twitter.com/s2PjCramEH — Indra Nooyi (@IndraNooyi) September 3, 2018 Google Diversity Google has been in the news quite a bit for diversity over the last few years, and not always for good reasons. Starbucks Starbucks HR content tends to skew a little more promotional than the other sources on the list, but its News and Features page is still a top example of how to manage internal content.

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Think back to the last time you were searching for a job. As you were researching, which companies looked like great places to work? More importantly, what made them seem that way?

Content marketing may be known primarily for lead generation and sales enablement, but it can also be a huge asset for human resources and recruitment. Companies create HR content to attract capable new hires with great resumes, and those same assets can be leveraged to keep employees happy during their tenure.

Since many of us spend more than 40 hours a week working in a single location—or with a specific team—it behooves a brand to educate professionals on what that experience is like. Plus, at larger companies with thousands of employees, HR content gives employees a central location to see what others are up to, learn about new policies, and find the latest news.

Here are five companies that have figured out how to blend culture, messaging, and human resources.

Microsoft Life

Microsoft is one of the largest companies on earth, rivaling Apple, Alphabet and Amazon, which means its human resources content is delivered to 131,000 people—that’s more people than the entire population of New Haven, Connecticut. So how does the brand keep all those employees informed, comfortable, engaged and on board? Through content, of course.

Microsoft Life, the company’s hub for HR-related content, posts video interviews with employees, outlines internal initiatives, offers resources like a guide to LGBT allyship at work, and publishes features like “Engineering training for women, by women.”

Washington University in St. Louis

Colleges and universities are typically effective at content marketing because they have a deep well of stories to draw from that don’t have to include explicit promotion for the school. Student, faculty, post-docs, fellows, and staff members rely on independent research and academic rigor.

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Washington University in St. Louis stands out by aiming some of its content at employees rather than investing…

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