How to Create Socially Aware Video Content Without Coming Across as Fake

How to Create Socially Aware Video Content Without Coming Across as Fake

With the increase in popularity of using video to communicate a message, many have taken the approach of creating socially aware video content with the hope that what they create will be the next great viral video. Instead, brands must seek authentic ways to piggyback off trending news while still staying true to their values and authentic brand voice. Maintaining authenticity When in the planning stages of creating a socially aware video, brands should consider first and foremost how the topic relates to the company's mission and voice. It's not enough to simply jump in on a social issue because it's trending in the news. Ultimately, Medeiros says people share content that has conviction. In February, Airbnb released the #weaccept campaign, announcing a company goal of providing short-term housing during the next five years for 100,000 refugees, disaster survivors and relief workers. Related: The Most Thought-Provoking Ads of 2017 Hope Horner, founder and CEO of Lemonlight Media, a video marketing company that produces and distributes branded content, told me by email that she encourages brands to continue embracing the role of politics and social issues in their video content moving into 2018. Tackling social issues When creating socially aware videos, the topic, tone and content are what enable the video to go viral. Heineken's "Worlds Apart" video, for example, didn't express a controversial opinion. Related Video: Consumers Will See Right Through You If Your Social Impact Message Isn't Authentic

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How to Create Socially Aware Video Content Without Coming Across as Fake

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Content marketers are always looking for ways to increase brand awareness and engagement. With the increase in popularity of using video to communicate a message, many have taken the approach of creating socially aware video content with the hope that what they create will be the next great viral video. With an ever-changing landscape, however, what worked a year ago won’t necessarily work now.

Related: 5 Tips for Creating Quality Video Content Even If You’re Clueless How to Begin

“Large volume spam campaigns are falling away from productivity,” Michael Litt, co-founder and CEO of Vidyard, told me when asked about the latest trends, noting that marketing automation is becoming a victim of its own success.

Instead, brands must seek authentic ways to piggyback off trending news while still staying true to their values and authentic brand voice. Burger King started off 2018 with an education video that linked the net neutrality debate to its signature Whopper. What was even more impressive was that it topped Ad Age‘s viral charts even during the Super Bowl advertisement period.

So, how can your brand harness the power of video to create social awareness on a viral level in 2018?

Maintaining authenticity

When in the planning stages of creating a socially aware video, brands should consider first and foremost how the topic relates to the company’s mission and voice. It’s not enough to simply jump in on a social issue because it’s trending in the news.

“The brand needs to look to its core purpose to find authentic ways to provide real value to its audience,” Jane Medeiros, vice president of content and creative services at Newscred, which offers a platform for enterprise content marketing, told me by email.

“Value can mean different things — it can be educational, beautiful, hilarious or simply useful, but it can’t just be a funny tagline anymore.”

Ultimately, Medeiros says people share content that has conviction. If you can make your audience think differently about something they know, or help them discover something they never thought of, that’s the recipe for success.

Jumping into the political conversation

It’s rare that all the experts agree on something — but every expert I approached believed brands shouldn’t let up when it comes to tackling political issues.

“It’s uncontroversial to say that 2017 was a controversial year,” said Medeiros. “In the year of fake news, brands that have been able to align their own core purpose with a moment in current events have been most successful.”

In February, Airbnb released the #weaccept campaign, announcing a company goal of providing short-term housing during the next five years for 100,000 refugees, disaster survivors and relief workers. The announcement came during the midst of the controversial travel ban issued by the President that halted the United…

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