How to Decrease Your Ad Spend by 69.39% (A PPC Insider’s Guide)

How to Decrease Your Ad Spend by 69.39% (A PPC Insider’s Guide)

How to make visitors love you (and increase AdWords sales at the same time) Let’s start by searching for something generic like “baseball gloves.” After typing that in, you should see a search engine result page (SERP) that looks something like this: This phrase is somewhat vague, so you’re probably still looking around at different baseball gloves at this point. This time around, I’ll search for a specific brand of baseball gloves. The ad text, “Wilson A2K Baseball Gloves,” is almost an exact match with what we just searched for. Now, when you click through to the DICK’S Sporting Goods website, up pops a page showing you only “Wilson baseball gloves.” Here’s what it looks like now: Once again, this is perfect message match. You search for something specific, and you get results on a landing page that match your expectations. So instead of whipping out your credit card, you’re probably going to hit the Back button and try another result because this one didn’t give you what you asked for. Otherwise, you take the risk of irrelevant keywords triggering your ads, like this: Ideally, if you already know that “stylish women’s dresses” gets a lot of searches, you should have ad text that works in that exact key phrase. In preparation, I did a quick Google search, and the following ad caught my eye: When I clicked through, I saw a landing page that featured the same exact benefits from the ad text before (“Save up to 50%” and “All-Inclusive”). Ideally, you’re going to have specific landing pages that match specific ads and keywords. This way, all you have to do is create a single landing page template, and then customize the text to automatically pull in the keyword someone searched for.

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ppc savings

Do you need customers tomorrow?

AdWords is hands-down the best place to put your money.

If you know what you’re doing, it’s almost like printing money.

You throw down $100 bucks today and bring in $200 tomorrow.

Seriously, no other marketing channel pays off that quick (online or off).

The trick is to start looking for the ‘underlying principles’ that are guiding your results.

For example, I recently took a client’s PPC account from converting only 4% to over 12% — that’s 3 times in just a few days.

Not only were they getting three times as many leads, but I also decreased how much they were spending on each conversion from $482.41 down to $147.65 (which comes out to just over 69% less!)

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In this article, I’m going to walk you through the same exact three steps I took to get these results (so you can do the same).

But first, let me walk you through a few examples so you can understand what your users see, what frustrates them, and why you sometimes force them to buy from the competition instead.

How to make visitors love you (and increase AdWords sales at the same time)

Let’s start by searching for something generic like “baseball gloves.”

After typing that in, you should see a search engine result page (SERP) that looks something like this:

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This phrase is somewhat vague, so you’re probably still looking around at different baseball gloves at this point.

As a result, the PPC ads you see are also appropriately vague, focusing on “baseball gloves” in general as opposed to a specific brand.

That means that, in an ideal world, you should click on any of these results and see something that ‘matches’ your intent. For example, let’s try the DICK’S Sporting Goods result first.

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You click on that middle option and hit a product category page that displays all baseball gloves, like this:

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The first thing you see is a large featured image that proclaims, “Baseball Gloves 101.”

The subtitle on that same image reads, “Choosing a Baseball Glove.” It’s all fairly generic, which is what the search term suggested.

So far so good, right?

When you type something generic like “baseball gloves” into Google’s search bar, you want to see a page that helps you compare baseball gloves of all shapes and sizes.

In other words, you’re researching your options and trying to get more information on how to go about buying the best baseball glove for your needs.

Notice that, on the left-hand side of the same page, there’s a list of options to narrow down your criteria. And then up top, you have a comparison button and drop-down menu that you can use to sort all of these baseball gloves by price, star rating, and more.

This DICK’S page is right on the money.

Now let’s get a little more specific.

This time around, I’ll search for a specific brand of baseball gloves. Let’s say that I’ve used a comparison tool or page and read a few reviews to narrow my choices down to a “Wilson baseball glove.”

After typing that in, we see DICK’S is popping up again. The ad text, “Wilson A2K Baseball Gloves,” is almost an exact match with what we just searched for.

So let’s give DICK’S another shot.

image 103

Now, when you click through to the DICK’S Sporting Goods website, up pops a page showing you only “Wilson baseball gloves.”

Here’s what it looks like now:

image 101

Once again, this is perfect message match.

You search for something specific, and you get results on a landing page that match your expectations.

This page from DICK’S has now narrowed their entire product catalog to the specific brand you want.

That makes you a happy searcher and increases the likelihood of you purchasing one of these gloves from this store.

Ultimately, that’s how good search results work. The customer looks for relevant results, and the brand hopes to generate conversions.

Now let’s look at one last example.

You’ve done all of the research now so that you’re ready to buy a very specific type of Wilson baseball glove.

You love this thing and want to get your hands on the right model ASAP. So you type in a far more specific search string: “Wilson 1788 A2K 11.25 SuperSkin Right Hand Glove.”

There’s so much going on in this search query. You’ve not only got the brand, but also the style, sizing, and even the right hand.

So let’s see what pops up when you hit Search:

image 106

Oh, look — the first result is from the Wilson brand’s website. It’s got the right model or series number in there, too.

So you know that’s probably going to give you exactly what you were looking for, right?

Wrong.

image 104

See the disconnect here?

You typed in that very specific long-tail search query because you wanted to buy a particular type of baseball glove.

The brand pops up in the first position to match your search query (and intent).

But then, when you click through expecting to see one glove, you see a bunch of different ones.

That wasn’t what you asked for. So instead of whipping out your credit card, you’re probably going to hit the Back button and try another result because this one didn’t give you what you asked for.

‘Message match’ is all about aligning what someone is searching for with the ads they see. Ultimately, you want the alignment to continue to the landing or product page that pops up.

The last thing you want after spending all of that money on a click is for someone to bounce immediately after hitting your site.

And yet that’s what commonly happens when what customers see doesn’t match their expectations.

Here’s how to avoid that same fate.

How to fix message match to increase conversion rates

Message match isn’t a difficult concept when you break it down into its individual components.

For example, we’re primarily talking about three major ingredients:

  1. The keywords someone types in
  2. The ad text they see
  3. The landing page that greets them after clicking

Let’s dive deep into each one to see how to get them right.

Step #1. Understand the intent behind someone’s search query.

Before you can write a single ad or landing page headline,…

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