The Art of Co-Marketing

The Art of Co-Marketing

Sharing Articles Consistently creating engaging content is hard. When we met that fateful day for coffee (our offices are only five minutes apart), we decided to take the next few weeks to each write a blog post on remote work. Olga, meanwhile, drafted a list of tips on how to improve collaboration among remote teams. Better yet, she also included an original infographic. Sharing Credibility When marketers focus too much on creating more, more, more, they forget that a huge part of successful content is conveying expertise. If you already have enough credibility to influence your audience, you can get away with only sharing your own perspective. A few months ago, my marketing team was working on a guest post about branding tips for young tech startups. If you spend four figures on one asset, you need people to see it. And at the very least, you’ll establish a relationship with an ally on a deeper level than if you just swapped guest posts. Chanty saved resources on graphics and added some gravitas to the blog post.

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One sunny afternoon last June, I met Olga Mykhoparkina, an ex-colleague and fellow marketer, for coffee. After commiserating over the challenges of content marketing and sharing some strategies to address them, a simple idea struck us. Our audiences overlapped some, but we weren’t competitors—so what if we joined forces on a few pieces of content?

For context, I am the head of digital marketing at Daxx, a technology company that helps brands build remote development teams. Olga is the CMO at Chanty, a startup producing an AI-powered messenger for team communication.

We’d both seen successful examples of co-marketing over the years. Uber and Spotify collaborated on a campaign that let customers pick music on their rides. Airbnb and Flipboard teamed up to create some multimedia content for four cities. These partnerships often came down to growing both user bases and improving brand awareness. The more we tossed the around the idea, the easier it was to see how it could simultaneously benefit both companies.

So we decided to take the plunge. Here are three ways you can too.

Sharing Articles

Consistently creating engaging content is hard. One way to lighten the load is to get a non-competing company that has expertise in a field that your audience cares out. You can work out the topics ahead of time to fill in the blanks in your coverage and then swap bylines.

At Daxx, we care about remote hiring for developers across the world. We’re headquartered in Amsterdam but have other offices in Europe, Israel, and the U.S. At the same time, Chanty is building a tool designed to foster remote team collaboration. The brand’s blog posts often focus on collaboration, corporate communication, and the rise of chat apps. Even though Olga and I already knew each other, there was a natural fit between our companies that just made sense.

When we met that fateful day for coffee (our offices are only five minutes apart), we decided to take the next few weeks to each write a blog post on remote work. My article was an insider’s look at all of the major platforms SaaS businesses can use to hire software developers. Olga, meanwhile, drafted a list of tips on how to improve collaboration among remote teams. Better yet, she also included an original infographic.

The result was a co-marketing win-win. Chanty’s guest post, for instance, brought in above-average engagement and 11 backlinks for our site. And since Daxx has a higher domain authority, Olga had access to a new subset of potential…

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