Trump content marketing mistakes with these election lessons

Trump content marketing mistakes with these election lessons. The 2016 presidential election results offered up numerous content marketing lessons to be learned. Meanwhile, 54 percent of all women supported Clinton, compared to the 42 percent who were for Trump. For instance, data compiled by The Washington Post showed Trump spent more time than Clinton in states like Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania – all states with high numbers of white voters that had voted for Barack Obama in 2012. You should: Recognize your own preferred audience and refine your messaging accordingly. Produce content that offers relevance and value to a specific audience. If unexpected changes arise, website audits will allow you to easily see what updates are necessary. Avoid confirmation bias Social media isn’t just an essential content marketing tool, it’s also how millions of Americans communicate. Whether it’s insisting on a specific strategy despite data contradicting it or only focusing on one channel because you personally feel it’s the best, confirmation bias clashes with the ultimate objective of marketing: engaging and converting potential customers. Personal feelings based on instinct and experience can be beneficial, but no content marketing strategy should discount hard facts.

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The 2016 presidential election results offered up numerous content marketing lessons to be learned. Regardless of political affiliation, President-elect Donald Trump’s victory generated vital takeaways you can identify and use in future content marketing efforts.

Target your audience


While both candidates worked to broaden their voting base throughout the general election, each also tailored their messaging to narrower audiences in an attempt to shore up support.
Trump performed well among white non-Hispanic voters, beating out Hillary Clinton with this demographic by 21 percentage points, according to data from Edison Research. Meanwhile, 54 percent of all women supported Clinton, compared to the 42 percent who were for Trump.
Looking at the states where each candidate spent significant amounts of time and money, as well as listening to their stump speeches, illustrates just how customized their campaigns were for these and other demographics. For instance, data compiled by The Washington Post showed Trump spent more time than Clinton in states like Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania – all states with high numbers of white voters that had voted for Barack Obama in 2012.
As a marketer, you can apply similar tactics to your content stratgegy. You should:
  • Recognize your own preferred audience and refine your messaging
    accordingly.
  • Fine-tune your content to be more impactful.
  • Produce content that offers relevance and value to a specific
    audience.
 

Plan for the unexpected


Even some die-hard Trump supporters likely woke up Wednesday morning in a state of total shock. Seemingly every major poll in the nation had predicted a Clinton win, including polls from Bloomberg, CBS, Fox News, Reuters, USA Today and NBC. Celebrated statistician Nate Silver even gave Clinton a 72 percent chance of victory heading into election night.
If there’s one lesson marketers should learn from this, it’s that educated guesses are still only guesses. Forecasts aren’t written in stone, and it pays to plan for unexpected events.
Casting your vote for a content marketing strategy you like doesn't guarantee it's the perfect choice.

For instance, websites that previously enjoyed high search...

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