10 Types of Content That’ll Make Your Event Marketing More Effective

10 Types of Content That’ll Make Your Event Marketing More Effective

According to Bizzabo, 80 percent of marketers believe live events are critical to their company’s success, and 87 percent of C-suite executives plan to invest more money in live events. Event and experiential marketers oversee happy hours, sure, but they also plan and execute presentations at trade shows, client dinners, product demos, Jeffersonian discussions, and award ceremonies. For these investments to bring in ROI, they need support from content. Brand messaging Before you take the stage or host a dinner, your brand needs to know who your customers are and what to say to them. Good messaging requires a lot of research and legwork—and it should all be documented. If you’re marketing a product that can support mid-level managers at Fortune 1000 finance companies, all the content you use, from the presentations to the menu, should be optimized for what you know about that demographic—how your consumer base speaks, what their pain points are, what they’re into when they’re not at work. It all depends on how many people are involved. For a conference with 5,000 people, it’s a different story. Email Event promotion is like content distribution—if you’re going to spend a lot of money on programming, you need to make sure people know where you’re going and how they can get involved. And make sure whatever you bring is clearly associated with your brand.

7 Social Media Marketing Tools Recommended By the Experts
This Week in Content Marketing: Is It Content Marketing or Sales Collateral?
10 Top Marketing Automation Influencers You Need to Know

Despite marketing’s digital transformation, event marketing is still the toast of the industry. According to Bizzabo, 80 percent of marketers believe live events are critical to their company’s success, and 87 percent of C-suite executives plan to invest more money in live events.

To a marketer writing all day, event marketing might sound like a glorified series of networking happy hours, but in reality, the job requires a lot of collaboration. Event and experiential marketers oversee happy hours, sure, but they also plan and execute presentations at trade shows, client dinners, product demos, Jeffersonian discussions, and award ceremonies. For these investments to bring in ROI, they need support from content.

In 2016, the Event Marketing Institute and Mosaic partnered to study trade show and experiential program attendees and exhibitors, and they discovered a surprising sense of optimism on both sides. According to their study, 75 percent of companies with event budgets between $50-100 million say they expect an ROI of more than 5:1 for live events.

The key to showing up well at a successful marketing event is preparation. More often than not, the lead-in process can’t all fall on a single employee, which means event marketers need to convince their colleagues to roll up their sleeves and get involved.

With all that in mind, here’s a list of useful content formats for supporting your company’s event marketing.

Brand messaging

Before you take the stage or host a dinner, your brand needs to know who your customers are and what to say to them. Without that, any event spend will just be total guesswork.

Good messaging requires a lot of research and legwork—and it should all be documented. Your messaging should cover a brand’s story, pillars, taglines, ideal client profiles, and key messages. Because when your team is on the floor at a crowded convention, they won’t discuss industry analysis at length with everyone they meet. They need their messaging in short bites, and everyone should be able to deliver an elevator pitch at a moment’s notice. If you’re marketing a product that can support mid-level managers at Fortune 1000 finance companies, all the content you use, from the presentations to the menu, should be optimized for what you know about that demographic—how your consumer base speaks, what their pain points are, what they’re into when they’re not at work.

Pre-event coverage

Covering your events on a blog is tricky. It all depends on how many people are involved. If you’re going to workshop with 50 people, that audience is probably too small to warrant dedicated solely dedicated to the event. For a conference with 5,000 people, it’s a different story.

Either way, you can always create something to ramp up to an event. Let your team explain what they’re excited about. Discuss the major themes with your own spin. To differentiate this writing from a press release, don’t just talk about your own presentations. Who are you excited to meet? What other sessions look intriguing? Here’s an example of something Henry Bruce, our SVP of marketing, wrote ahead of this year’s Intelligent Content Conference.

Lastly, if someone wants to find out more about the event, make sure all content links to a landing page.

Email

Event promotion is like content distribution—if you’re going to spend a lot of money on programming, you need to make sure people know where you’re going and how they can get involved. Given that our inboxes get flooded with reminder emails, your content team should take a long look at what they can do to stand out from everyone else, whether that means going with a bold subject line, getting a little something extra from the design team, or focusing on an exclusive giveaway or piece of content. (We raffle off Beats headphones to people who register for certain things before our events.)

You don’t have to throw out your entire email strategy while an event approaches—keep your regular newsletters going, but consider placing a nice little widget to register for your brand’s presentation somewhere in the body. If an upcoming event is focused on a certain theme, your email newsletter in the preceding weeks might include a round-up of evergreen blog posts on that same idea.

Presentation decks

A great slide…

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0