31% of Tech Workers Say They Would #DeleteFacebook [New Data]

31% of Tech Workers Say They Would #DeleteFacebook [New Data]

So when Blind surveyed its user base to find out how many tech workers planned to delete their Facebook accounts -- inquiring minds had to know what the results were. Blind decided to run a survey of its users to find out how much the #deletefacebook trend resonated among tech workers, collecting a total of over 2,600 responses between March 20 and March 24 of this year. Facebook's own employee responses were accounted for, with 2% of that base reporting it would delete the app. Scores of people are deleting Uber after the company serviced rides at JFK airport while taxis were striking against muslim ban #deleteuber pic.twitter.com/D8cJMlxOxQ — Josh Butler (@JoshButler) January 29, 2017 It's also interesting to note that 38% of respondents from Google said they would delete Facebook, seeing as the company has faced its own backlash and negative headlines pertaining to user data in recent weeks, as well. Blind has informed us that Amazon had the highest response rate, with employees from that company accounting for roughly 11% of the survey's total base. For those who don't work in tech -- just how seriously should these results be taken? Henry Franco, HubSpot's social campaign strategy associate, also encourages taking the survey results with a grain of salt, largely due to the audience surveyed. - Dharmesh Shah And while seeing my full Facebook data file -- which may be in the possession of parties of which I'm not aware -- was weird, I'm inclined to believe my decision not to delete my account is largely because I work in tech. As Andrews pointed out, the survey didn't measure was how many of the people who said "yes" to deleting Facebook would also plan to delete its three umbrella apps. "The fact is, there are a ton of reasons not to delete your account, as Facebook has a strong product with a deep moat," he explains.

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tech-workers-would-delete-facebook

If you work in tech and haven’t yet downloaded the app Blind — well, you’re missing out.

Blind calls itself “an anonymous community app for the workplace,” where employees of various tech companies gather to namelessly ask questions, leave feedback, or start discussions about everything ranging from salary to industry gossip.

So when Blind surveyed its user base to find out how many tech workers planned to delete their Facebook accounts — inquiring minds had to know what the results were.

What’s #DeleteFacebook?

The survey came in light of a recent scandal around Facebook, when it was revealed that analysis and profiling firm Cambridge Analytica may have abused personal user data, which allegedly should never have been in its possession in the first place.

Among other responses to the allegations — which included outrage, criticism, and the occasional lack of surprise among some — the hashtag #deletefacebook began trending on Twitter, reflecting the widespread sentiment and desire to delete the app and one’s account on it for good.

Blind decided to run a survey of its users to find out how much the #deletefacebook trend resonated among tech workers, collecting a total of over 2,600 responses between March 20 and March 24 of this year.

The Survey Results

Overall, 31% of respondents answered “yes,” whereas 69% answered “no.”

The responses were especially intriguing when broken down among Blind’s top five tech companies, which were determined based on the highest volume of responses. Facebook’s own employee responses were accounted for, with 2% of that base reporting it would delete the app.

#DeleteFacebook_ Top 5 (1)

It’s worth noting that the second-highest company responding “yes” to #deletefacebook is Snap Inc.: the parent company of Facebook’s rival app, Snapchat, which the former has been trying to emulate by way of new features and capabilities for many years.

That began after Facebook’s failed attempt in 2013 to acquire Snapchat — and it’s worth noting that Facebook also owns Instagram, which is arguably the most similar property to Snapchat.

Notice that ride-hailing app Uber ranks third — reminding me of the 2017 trend to #deleteuber that came after a series of PR crises for the company. One of them was a business move that many interpreted to be Uber’s capitalization on a U.S. executive order calling for a travel ban from certain countries.

Scores of people are deleting Uber after the company serviced rides at JFK airport…

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