5 Public Relations Tips to Help You Write a Pitch Someone Will Actually Read

5 Public Relations Tips to Help You Write a Pitch Someone Will Actually Read

My inbox is constantly flooded with pitches from public relations (PR) professionals, and the majority of them are complete garbage. “We are launching this amazing new app and it would be perfect for your audience.” Looks interesting, but I see this was sent to 50 email recipients, taking laziness to the highest level. Johnson says to avoid copy-and-paste emails altogether, saying, “I always write a unique pitch for every recipient, even avoiding using a template as a guide. The last thing you want to do is give your target extra work. Highlight the value you are providing them if you expect them to take the time to reply to you,” offers Johnson. Stop using the same automated templates that every other PR "pro" is using. “Media outlets and journalists receive so many pitches every single day, so it’s important that you do everything in your power to stand out from all of the template-pitches that they receive, all of which appear to be the same. “Writing a long-winded pitch says that you don’t value your target’s time. The less they have to think, the greater chance you have receiving a response,” explains Johnson. Make yours clear (and quickly) for the best response rate.

The 14 Best Autoresponder Software in 2019 (Plus Free Autoresponders)
How to Write Emails People Will Actually Open
20 Amazing Ways to Use ViewedIt Screen Recording and Webcam Videos
5 Public Relations Tips to Help You Write a Pitch Someone Will Actually Read

My inbox is constantly flooded with pitches from public relations (PR) professionals, and the majority of them are complete garbage. While a few come over that are perfectly fine, most are downright cringe-worthy.

“Want to interview the company founder Jonathon?”

You can’t even spell my name correctly? Pass.

“We are launching this amazing new app and it would be perfect for your audience.”

Looks interesting, but I see this was sent to 50 email recipients, taking laziness to the highest level. Pass.

I know a lot of people in the PR space and have built some amazing relationships over the years. One of those relationships is with Lavonte Johnson, CEO of Star Relations, and while his company focuses on securing press coverage across music and celebrity outlets, we constantly talk strategy. His company secures press on outlets like Billboard, VIBE and XXL — major music industry outlets that receive pitches around the clock, so he knows how to craft an effective pitch that, at the very least, is read by the target recipient.

If you want to write pitches that will be read, rather than sent to the trash immediately, consider the five tips below.

1. Be fully aware of whom you are pitching.

It’s important that you are fully aware of who you are pitching. Is your pitch related to what they typically cover? You need to put some effort in, but sadly, most pitches are done completely blind, with zero research or thought behind them.

“Take time to read something that your target recently wrote and make sure to include a little detail pertaining to that, as it helps to build a relationship immediately. It takes just a few minutes to get familiar with your target’s previous work, and it greatly increases the chance of them not only reading your pitch, but also actually responding,” suggests Johnson.

Social media engagement is such an easy way to lay a little foundational ground work. A follow, with some “likes” and replies mixed in is an easy way to get one someone’s radar. Then, when you send your pitch, your name is somewhat familiar, which increases the chance of your email avoiding the trash.

2. Avoid emails that reek of a copy-and-paste job.

I…

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0