How Entrepreneurs and Executives Can Develop a Writing Habit — and Why They Should

How Entrepreneurs and Executives Can Develop a Writing Habit — and Why They Should

An executive with the ability to communicate clearly through the written world can reap many benefits. This is an unfortunate reality because we live in a content-driven world where more than 3 million blog posts are published every day. Executives, however, often lack the time to write. How could an executive find the time to write? If you combine a morning writing ritual with the next three tips, you will face little friction from your own mind or your surroundings (e.g., family, coworkers, etc. A habit shouldn't take you more time than you can offer to it. With 30 minutes set up for writing, you want to crank out as many words as you can, regardless of its quality. A problem you will likely face, however, is the blank page -- often cited as one of the main creativity blocks writers face. Write what you know. While you don't want to say anything that can compromise your organization, you still want to express yourself freely, sharing your opinions, experiences and even failures.

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An executive with the ability to communicate clearly through the written world can reap many benefits.

How Entrepreneurs and Executives Can Develop a Writing Habit -- and Why They Should

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Writing is often seen as a creative task outside the realm of executives. After all, no executive has never been praised for her writing skills. While there have been a number of high-profile executives who have published bestselling books — Sheryl Sandberg being the best example — they are more the exception than the rule.

This is an unfortunate reality because we live in a content-driven world where more than 3 million blog posts are published every day. An executive with the ability to communicate clearly through the written world can reap many benefits, including more press interviews, speaking opportunities and strategic partnerships.

Executives, however, often lack the time to write. How could an executive find the time to write? By building a habit. Here’s how you can get started.

Do it first thing in the day.

In theory, you could write anytime you are in front of your computer. You could write when you are on a lunch break, in between meetings or after you come back from work. The best time you could use for writing, it turns out, is the morning.

The morning offers several benefits that can’t be found at other times of the day.

First and foremost, you have more energy to spend on a creative task like writing (assuming you sleep enough hours). Second, you are less stressed, which also liberates your mind to express itself more freely. Finally, you face no meetings, calls or emails at this time of the day.

If you combine a morning writing ritual with the next three tips, you will face little friction from your own mind or your surroundings (e.g., family, coworkers, etc.), letting you write without restrictions.

Do it for 30 minutes.

A habit shouldn’t take you more time…

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