How to Make the Offer the Most Important Part of Your Presentation

How to Make the Offer the Most Important Part of Your Presentation

How to Make the Offer the Most Important Part of Your Presentation. Ultimately, people buy what they really want and do what they really want to do. I created our Irresistible Offer Architecture® out of a need to have a blueprint that would enable any speaker or presenter to offer any product or service to any audience anywhere, by any media and get a desirable result. Let’s assume you have a product or service that’s just not connecting with the hot buttons of your audience members and you can’t figure out why. But a truly powerful presentation of any product or service focuses on personal and emotional reasons to have it. When value feels like it’s much, much higher than price, people in an audience surrender to an irresistible price-value equation. They literally sit there watching, saying to themselves, “No, I’m not going to buy this. You can also contrast to trivial items: That same $1,000 system that makes you a millionaire in three years costs just 91 cents a day, and you can’t make a Starbucks stop once a day for that. We say, “Do you really think you can go through this entire seminar and not go home empowered to increase your income by at least 2.5 percent?” Triangle 3: Reassurance The number-one reason somebody in your audience doesn’t accept your offer is that they remember a time or times when they believed somebody like you about some comparable promises and feel they were let down or deceived. These triangles connect with each other, and when you can use all three, you make it very hard for people to say no to your offer, which is the goal!

Smart Advice for Professionally Editing Your YouTube Videos
Use Video Education Campaigns to Grow Your Business
How to Monetize Every YouTube Video
How to Make the Offer the Most Important Part of Your Presentation

The following excerpt is from Dan S. Kennedy and Dustin Mathews’ book No BS Guide to Powerful Presentations. Buy it now from Amazon | Barnes & Noble | iTunes

Persuading people can be extremely difficult, just difficult, comparatively easy or very easy. One of the things that moves the needle on that scale is the offer itself. A lot of people do not understand this. They worry over every other part of a presentation, particularly the visual elements — slides, graphics, video, stories and themselves. Ultimately, people buy what they really want and do what they really want to do. When an offer connects with that, it alone can drive extraordinary results from an un-ordinary, just serviceable presentation.

When you have an irresistible offer advantage, you can:

  • Sell without having to hard sell;
  • Sell at a premium price instead of a price like your competitors or at discounts; and
  • Attract new clients, patients or customers easily.

I created our Irresistible Offer Architecture® out of a need to have a blueprint that would enable any speaker or presenter to offer any product or service to any audience anywhere, by any media and get a desirable result. Further, I wanted it to be “fill in the blank” quick, because frankly, a lot of people find themselves getting opportunities to speak and giving presentations without the time or without taking time to properly prepare. This blueprint or template allows you to put an offer together on the fly.

There are nine keys to Irresistible Offer Architecture®, which I’ve organized into three triangles:

Triangle 1: Hot buttons

Different people have different hot buttons. A hot button is the one that, when pushed, sets off the strongest possible “I want that — and I want it now — regardless of what I have to do or pay” response.

Let’s assume you have a product or service that’s just not connecting with the hot buttons of your audience members and you can’t figure out why. I always challenge myself with this: I suppose that no one in my audience will be hot-button motivated by any part of my product, service or offer. Maybe I’m offering colonoscopy exams, or I’m a CPA offering a second-opinion review of your past three years’ tax returns. They have benefits and benefits of benefits, but still, they aren’t exciting. I’ll turn to the bonus. One of the most famous examples of this, from TV commercials — which are presentations — comes from Sports Illustrated magazine. A great presentation about Sports Illustrated might sell an acceptable number of subscriptions, but offering the “football phone” (yes, before smartphones, in the days of landlines) sold an amazing number of subscriptions. People who didn’t really care about the magazine couldn’t resist the football-shaped phone. Keywords: couldn’t resist. This…

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0