How to Present Your Complex Self on Social Media

How to Present Your Complex Self on Social Media

What does that mean for social media branding? Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. So, creating and maintaining a social media brand is important. Up to now, you may have maintained separate social media channels for your private life and professional life. I post to this account often, I don't shy away from sharing personal details about my life and I actively engage with my followers. As a result, I now have an audience of more than 36,000 and consider Instagram to be a major pipeline for funneling new customers to my product website. Related: The Founder of a Macaron Bakery Used Her Past Experience As a Photo Editor to Build Her Instagram-Ready Brand What does this mean for your social media pages? For me, being authentic has often meant showcasing my highly feminine side. And because I know that authenticity will make or break my social media brand, I choose to freely share that part of myself with my audience. Perhaps it's your chosen hobby or favorite sport, your obsession with animals or your quirky bookish side.

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Women often feel pressure to present a polished image. What does that mean for social media branding?

How to Present Your Complex Self on Social Media

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Like many other women in business, I’ve grappled over the years with the best way to present myself on social media. Do I express my honest opinions? Do I share personal photos as well as professional snaps? Should I maintain multiple accounts, sharply dividing my work life from my private life? How can I engage with my audience in a way that helps grow my business, while feeling true to who I really am?

These questions swirl in the minds of female entrepreneurs, CEOs, leaders and professionals because we women feel indirect and direct pressure to cultivate a powerful public image. Many of my friends and colleagues feel that they must carefully curate their social media persona, and understand the ramifications of failing to do so. Data confirms that global internet users are spending more time on social media sites than ever before — currently averaging 135 minutes per day. A leader without a social media presence is missing a key opportunity to reach potential customers, partners, influencers and talent.

So, creating and maintaining a social media brand is important. And there’s a wealth of information out there for those who want to build their social media presence and run it effectively (these tips from Sprout Social are a great start). But, what specifically do female leaders need to keep in mind about social media?

Get personal.

Up to now, you may have maintained separate social media channels for your private life and professional life. For many women leaders, this translates to a fairly active Facebook page for friends and family, and a sporadically updated LinkedIn page for professional networking. This is a decent baseline, but you shouldn’t be afraid to upgrade from the norm.

If you’re ready to take things to the next level, I’d encourage you to set…

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