How to Reduce Your eCommerce Bounce Rates by 30-40% Using Personalization

How to Reduce Your eCommerce Bounce Rates by 30-40% Using Personalization

A bounce rate is actually a combination of several factors, though every time someone visits your store but doesn’t make a purchase, it’s fair to say the person bounced. Then again, a high bounce rate also means fewer people are making any purchase from your store. Needless to say, you’ll be out of business soon if your bounce rate is too high. Segment your email list Email segmentation is a valuable personalization tactic that cuts across all industries. Interestingly, in my experience, indifferent subscribers will still not visit your site, and it doesn’t matter since they’ll only increase your bounce rate. In the example below, also from Duda, visitors who visit a “Contact Us” page during working hours are one click away from calling and setting an appointment. Personalization also involves showing shoppers product recommendations based on what they’re about to purchase from your site. Optimize product pages for SEO Your eCommerce store’s product page is almost literally the most valuable page on your eCommerce site. Visitors will be people who are likely interested in that product’s page after seeing such information. Or for those who have added items to their cart already and are about to leave without buying, you can offer to email them their cart.

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How to Reduce Your eCommerce Bounce Rates by 30-40% Using Personalization

This era is a unique one. There are many resources for making businesses successful, especially on the internet, including but not limited to social media, search engines, paid adverts, listing sites (here’s a massive list of business listing sites), and well, internet users.

But not every business thrives, especially on the internet. For eCommerce stores, one contributing factor is a high bounce rate.

What exactly counts as a bounce rate? A bounce rate is actually a combination of several factors, though every time someone visits your store but doesn’t make a purchase, it’s fair to say the person bounced. So bounce rate is the percentage of people who leave your website after visiting a particular page.

A high bounce rate can be disastrous. It affects your page’s ranking because Google automatically assumes the content on the page doesn’t make sense, after all, if people are leaving in droves when they visit the page. I’m sure you can already see how much this would hurt an eCommerce store.

Then again, a high bounce rate also means fewer people are making any purchase from your store. Needless to say, you’ll be out of business soon if your bounce rate is too high.

If it’s any consolation, according to this chart, a typical eCommerce store has a bounce rate of 45.68%.

Benchmark Bounce rate by industry for ecommerce bounce rates

What can you do to improve your bounce rate? Here are some useful personalization tips.

1. Segment your email list

Email segmentation is a valuable personalization tactic that cuts across all industries. That is, you can use email segmentation whether you’re in real estate, software, retail, entertainment, or any other industry for that matter.

Segmentation simply means grouping your email subscribers by their preferences, behavior, geography, demographics, or their interests. For example, here’s a pop-up from Live Chat Inc that’s a classic case of segmentation.

Optimize product pages for SEO for ecommerce bounce rates

You can be sure that visitors who are interested only in receiving podcast notifications will not receive emails about a new blog post three times a week and vice versa unless they opt for both.

Additionally, you can segment subscribers by their email activity. A tool like OmniSend, which is an email and marketing automation tool primarily for eCommerce sites, allows you to segment subscribers in truly ingenious ways. For example, you can segment subscribers by whether they have:

  • Been sent a campaign
  • Clicked a campaign link
  • Opened a campaign

From there you can choose and set time limits for these conditions.

Omnisend for ecommerce bounce rates

When you send emails to subscribers based on their preferences, it reduces your bounce rate. Why is that?

Because you’re only sending them emails about things they truly care about and not random offers. Or you’re only sending emails that touch them at their point of need. They’re more likely to click on the link in the email, visit your site, and take action. Interestingly, in my experience, indifferent subscribers will still not visit your site, and it doesn’t matter since they’ll only increase your bounce rate.

2. Segment your visitors/shoppers

Segmenting folks on your email list is one thing, but segmenting your visitors shouldn’t be ignored either. Again, this has a broad spectrum, and you’re limited only by your imagination. I’ll give some examples.

If you run an international online store, you can segment visitors by location. Serving visitors content based on their location is called “geo-targeting.” For example, if you run a clothing business, it is impractical to show visitors from West Africa different types of winter coats, since they do…

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