Native Video vs. YouTube Video: What Should Small Businesses Use?

Native Video vs. YouTube Video: What Should Small Businesses Use?

When it comes to video marketing, there’s another big decision that can often stump businesses and some marketers alike: native video or YouTube? What is Native Video? So, if your Facebook video was uploaded to the site or app directly, it would be played in Facebook’s video player, instead of a YouTube player. Quintly actually found that the interaction rate of native videos was 109.67% higher than shared YouTube videos, and that native Facebook videos had a 477.76% higher share rate than YouTube videos posted onto Facebook. You can see this on YouTube, too, but only for all views– it can be a big advantage to see how your video does on each individual platform it’s shared on. I’ve sometimes seen businesses use YouTube links when they want to share content that exceeds the platform’s maximum time limits. There’s also another obvious benefit to YouTube: when you create YouTube videos, you’re putting video content on a new site where an enormous and diverse audience is waiting to see it. People on YouTube come to the site just to watch videos, allowing for more long-term content. Native Video vs. YouTube: Which Should I Choose? The Overview of Mobile Apps Market: Why... How to Upload a Video to YouTube from Start to... On The Rise Of The New LinkedIn [Infographic] Interested in Video Marketing?

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There’s a lot of choices that businesses have to face when taking over their marketing. They have to decide which social media profiles to choose, which web host to go with, and what you want your primary strategies to be. When it comes to video marketing, there’s another big decision that can often stump businesses and some marketers alike: native video or YouTube?

Uploading your content with native videos and through YouTube each have their own unique benefits and potential drawbacks. Most people aren’t aware of these, however, and end up rolling the dice and going with what seems easiest, forgetting about the strategy of it.

In this post, we’re going to discuss native video vs. YouTube, helping you decide which—if either—are better for your business.

What is Native Video?

Many social media sites have their own native video platforms. This means that you can either upload video files directly as a post, or use the platform’s in-app camera to take new content and share it directly. Some have both, which is how we’ve ended up with Facebook Stories and Instagram live.

So, if your Facebook video was uploaded to the site or app directly, it would be played in Facebook’s video player, instead of a YouTube player.

While aesthetically it doesn’t make much difference for the user, it can make a big difference in the long-term results for your marketing strategies. Because of this, you want to make a strategic decision about whether you want to use native video, YouTube videos, or a combination of both.

Let’s take a look at the benefits of native videos first.

The Benefits of Native Video

There are a number of valuable reasons why you’ll want to spend the time to upload native videos on different platforms instead of just copying and pasting a YouTube link. The biggest advantage, in my opinion, is the boost native videos get in many newsfeed algorithms.

This is particularly noticeable with Facebook. It’s been clear for quite awhile that native videos perform are given a priority in newsfeeds, giving them a much higher visibility and engagement as a result.

Twitter native video
Twitter’s native videos, like other platforms, fits seamlessly into the feeds.

Plenty of data backs this up. Quintly actually found that the interaction rate of native videos was 109.67% higher than shared YouTube videos, and that native Facebook videos had a 477.76% higher share rate than YouTube videos posted onto Facebook. This is undeniably significant.

When you post video content natively, you’ll also get more detailed reporting on the individual platforms. You’ll be able to see how many video views it received, and what the rate of viewing completion was. You can see this on YouTube, too, but only for all views– it can be a big advantage to see how your video does on each individual platform it’s shared on.

Facebook native video

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