Where the hell did this head-banging purple bird meme even come from

Where the hell did this head-banging purple bird meme even come from

A purple, head-banging bird is everywhere now. The popular pigeon has become a meme monster. The bird is the creation of illustrator and visual development artist Syd Weiler who unleashed the fowl upon the world after some unexpected inspiration. Weiler said she got the idea while visiting Minneapolis. "I had never thought about pigeons before. They're funny little birds. They have really shiny, colorful, almost rainbow-y feathers, but then they bob around and waddle and beg for food. The stickers have made their mark across Facebook, even, as noted by The Verge, invading Facebook comment sections of sites like Vox and The New York Times. The comments section on a recent post by Weiler shows that even the creator can't escape the monster meme. "[The trash doves] were made to make people laugh and make people happy," she says.

Searching for Video, Images, Audio, Gifs, Podcasts, Memes & Radio: a directory of search engines, finders & generators
Facebook’s rocket ship icon is a test flight for a secondary news feed
‘Bird Box’: Breaking Barriers in the Streaming World by Marketing Through Memes
The popular
The popular “Trash Dove” currently flooding Facebook. Image: Syd Weiler

A purple, head-banging bird is everywhere now. It’s on Facebook, YouTube, in the comments on New York Times stories and even in your texts. The popular pigeon has become a meme monster.

The bird is the creation of illustrator and visual development artist Syd Weiler who unleashed the fowl upon the world after some unexpected inspiration.

Weiler said she got the idea while visiting Minneapolis. “I was sitting by a pond … and there were just pigeons everywhere,” she said. “I had never thought about pigeons before. They’re funny little birds. They have really shiny, colorful, almost rainbow-y feathers, but then they bob around and waddle and beg for food. They’re like doves but they eat trash.”

She made the images of the bird, available on iOS 10, last year, creating them digitally based on her original drawings. She even streamed their creation live on Twitch.TV, where she’s a “full-time creative streamer,” creating art in front of viewers daily which, Weiler said, is “like monetizing a YouTube channel.”

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0