8 Common Website Mistakes Revealed Via Content Audits

8 Common Website Mistakes Revealed Via Content Audits

Similar to a technical SEO audit, the results of the content audit should drive the strategies and priorities of the next stages of content work. Here are some examples of content for each stage: Awareness: Blog posts (explainers, how-tos, etc), e-books, educational webinars, infographics Consideration: Product comparisons, case studies, videos Purchase: Product pages, trial offers, demos, coupons Retention: Blog posts (product applications, success stories, etc), newsletters, social media content Mistake #3: Testimonials aren’t used to their full potential There are so many pages dedicated solely to testimonials out there on the Interwebs. It’s just not on a testimonials page. If it’s a testimonial about how a product solved a problem they had, use it on that product page. Testimonials can also help you improve your local relevance in search. The best car dealership websites, however, are creating content that matters to their local communities. Having pricing information on your website also helps establish trust with the prospect. A web page should include: What is the product and why should a prospect care about it? While you don’t want product to be the focus of your blog, it should be easy for a user to get to the core pages of your site if they want to do so. As you’re auditing a site, you’ll find pages that relate to one another that don’t link.

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One of the advantages of working for an agency is the volume of websites we get to evaluate. The majority of clients who sign up for ongoing SEO and/or content services will receive a content audit. Similar to a technical SEO audit, the results of the content audit should drive the strategies and priorities of the next stages of content work. Without the audit, you can’t create an effective strategy because you first need to know what types of content you’ve got, what content you’re missing, and what content you’ve got too much of.

While there are many posts out there about how to perform a content audit (and I encourage you to check out these posts: How to Do a Content Audit and 5 Lessons Learned from a Content Audit), I am going to be focusing on what my common findings have been from recently conducting 15 content audits. My aim is to give you more of a framework on how you can talk to clients about their content or, if you are the client, ways you can improve your website content to keep users on the site longer and, ultimately, convert.

Mistake #1: No clear calls-to-action

I have yet to complete a content audit where creating clearer calls-to-action wasn’t a focus. The goal of a page should be obvious to any visitor (or content auditor). What is it that you want a visitor who lands on this page to do next? Many of our clients are not e-commerce, so it may feel less obvious; however, assuming you want someone to stay on your website, what’s next?

Even if answer is “I want them to visit my store,” make it easy for them. Add a prominent “Visit Our Store” button. If it’s a simple blog page, what are the next blog articles someone should read based on what they just read? Or do you have a relevant e-book you’d like them to download? You got them to the end of your post — don’t lose the visitor because they aren’t sure what to do next!

Mistake #2: A lack of content for all stages of the customer journey

One thing we often do when conducting content audits is track where in the sales funnel each page is aimed (awareness, consideration, purchase, or retention). What we sometimes find is that clients tend to have a disproportionate amount of content aimed at driving a purchase, but not enough for awareness, consideration, and retention. This isn’t always the case, particularly if they have a blog or resources hub; however, the consideration and retention stages are often overlooked. While the buyer cycle is going to be different for every product, it’s still important to have content that addresses each stage, no matter how brief the stage is.

Retention is a big deal too! It is way more cost-efficient and easier to upsell and cross-sell current customers than bring in new. Your customers are also less price-sensitive because they know your brand is worth it. You definitely want to provide content for this audience too to keep them engaged with the brand and find new uses for your products. Plus, you’ve already got their contact information, so delivering content to them is much easier than a prospect.

Here are some examples of content for each stage:

Awareness: Blog posts (explainers, how-tos, etc), e-books, educational webinars, infographics

Consideration: Product comparisons, case studies, videos

Purchase: Product pages, trial offers, demos, coupons

Retention: Blog posts (product applications, success stories, etc), newsletters, social media content

Mistake #3: Testimonials aren’t used to their full potential

There are so many pages dedicated solely to testimonials out there on the Interwebs. It’s painful. Who trusts a testimonials page over reviews on third-party sites like Yelp, Google My Business, or Tripadvisor? No one. That being said, there is a place for testimonials. It’s just not on a testimonials page.

The best way to use a testimonial is to pair it with the appropriate copy. If it’s a testimonial about how easy and fast a customer received their product, use that on a shipping page. If it’s a testimonial about how a product solved a problem they had, use it on that product page. This will enhance your copy and help to alleviate any anxieties a prospective customer has with their decision to purchase.

Testimonials can also help you improve your local relevance in search. If you have a storefront that is targeting particular cities, ask for a customer’s city and state when you gather testimonials. Then, include relevant testimonials along with their…

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