How to Write a Resume: Your Checklist of Resume Tips

How to Write a Resume: Your Checklist of Resume Tips

How to Write a Resume Write your name, email address, and phone number at the top. Include the jobs that are most relevant to your target industry. Copy your text into a resume template that fits the tone of your industry. So, I did what I do when I'm anxious: I made a list of all the little things you need to do when writing and editing your resume. Things to Check: Have you included your basic contact information -- including your name, email address, and phone number -- at the top? Things to Check: Are you writing in a tone that matches that of the company to which you're applying? Have you customized your resume for the specific job to which you're applying? (Highlight work experience and skills that are relevant to the position -- don't just write down every job you've ever held.) (For instance, if you're a recent graduate with internships in different fields, you might list your most relevant experience at the top, instead of ordering everything by date.) If you've checked the boxes of all the resume tips that apply to you, you should be ready to submit your application.

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how to write a resume

How to Write a Resume

  1. Write your name, email address, and phone number at the top.
  2. Verify that your email address and related contact information sound professional.
  3. Include the jobs that are most relevant to your target industry.
  4. Describe each company, job title, your responsibilities, and your accomplishments. Be specific!
  5. Summarize this experience in a separate “Key Skills” section.
  6. Copy your text into a resume template that fits the tone of your industry.
  7. Verify that your text is aligned, consistent in format, and clickable when linking to samples.
  8. Incorporate keywords that automated resume scanners might look for.
  9. Proofread for grammar, brevity, and specific action verbs.
  10. Convert your resume to a PDF file.

I can’t think of many tasks people dread more than writing a resume. There are so many little things you need to add, rephrase, check, double-check, triple-check … and yet, somehow, your resume still goes out with your name as “Corey Wainwrite” from “HubStop.” It’s anxiety-inducing.

So, I did what I do when I’m anxious: I made a list of all the little things you need to do when writing and editing your resume.

Here’s my checklist of resume tips — and I wish you the best of luck with your job search.

The Ultimate Checklist of Resume Tips

I’ve divided all the must-do tasks into four sections and did my best to order them chronologically. Some could probably exist in more than one section or be completed in a different order, so I’ve ordered items where I thought they most naturally fit during the resume-writing process.

Is Your Contact Information Professional? Things to Check:

Have you included your basic contact information — including your name, email address, and phone number — at the top?

Is your email address professional? (e.g. sara@gmail.com vs. sarabear@gmail.com)

Is your email address associated with a familiar domain, like Gmail? (Outdated domains can be a red flag for tech-savvy companies.)

Do your resume details align with your LinkedIn profile? (Hiring managers will likely review both.)

Have you included links to social media profiles, portfolios, and a personal website if relevant?

Have you audited your social profiles to ensure no unprofessional content is available to the public?

Have you customized any communication within your resume that addresses the company or hiring manager by name?

If you’re sending your resume as a Google Doc, have you granted the recipient the proper permissions to view it (or opened up permissions to everyone)?

Is Your Resume Written for the Industry? Things to Check:

Are you writing in a tone that matches that of the company to which you’re applying? (For instance, while still writing professionally, you might use a different tone when applying to work at a new tech startup versus an established accounting firm.)

Have you customized your resume for the specific job to which you’re applying? (Highlight work experience and skills that are relevant to the position — don’t just write down every job you’ve ever held.)

Do you have a clear objective at the top of your resume that is company-focused, rather than you-focused? (You don’t need…

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