Can’t Get That Click? 5 Simple Strategies for CTAs That Convert [Examples]

Can’t Get That Click? 5 Simple Strategies for CTAs That Convert [Examples]

The boxes look similar – using the same font and shapes – and worse, the critical call to action is in a smaller font. Look what happens when Mozilla opts to focus on its most important call to action: It’s simple but effective. To simplify your calls to action on your site: Remove the navigation menu on the landing page. But the page is about coffee. Here is the latest landing page: With the words, “Verve X Dripkit” layered over a cup of coffee, the product is clear. You’re keeping the landing page simple and you have a clear CTA. Instead of keeping a simple “free download” button, here’s what iMPACT did: “Show me how to attract more customers” is catchy, right? There is no one answer to the best color choice to make. Plus, the use of color in this landing page captures attention but steers the visitors’ eyes away from the CTA. This color increases the visibility of the CTA.

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Analytics show many visitors on your website. But that sizable traffic isn’t reflected in your conversions.

What could be happening? Could the most important individual element – the call-to-action button – be the culprit?

Perhaps. But you don’t need magic to make your visitors convert. You need to apply basic principles, test your results, and see what works best.

In this post, you’ll learn from four success stories – from the original version through the CTA transformation. You’ll see how these simple strategies can result in nice jumps in conversion rates.

Keep it simple

Too many choices overwhelm visitors and kill your conversion rate. Choices add distractions. Simplicity is more effective.

Mozilla learned this the hard way. Mozilla wants visitors to download its Firefox web browser. It’s the company’s bread and butter. But here’s what you saw on the landing page:

It’s a bad game of Where’s Waldo, the browser edition. Where is the bread-and-butter CTA? It’s nicked into the upper right corner, mirroring all other elements on the page. But you’re there for the browser, not swanky Mozilla apparel (I didn’t know it was a thing).

The landing page is too complex. The boxes look similar – using the same font and shapes – and worse, the critical call to action is in a smaller font. The solution – simplify. Look what happens when Mozilla opts to focus on its most important call to action:

It’s simple but effective. One choice. You can’t miss it.

To simplify your calls to action on your site:

  • Remove the navigation menu on the landing page.
  • Include one call to action.
  • Make the CTA clear.

But clarity requires work on the copy and page layout. Let’s see how this would go.

Stay on message

Let’s play a game. Look at this landing page.

Stop looking. Now, what was the call to action? What is it for?

If you can recall it, did you guess a safari pack of some sort? Travel? The first time I came across this website, I did. (OK, you can look at…

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