Don’t just jump on the mobile video bandwagon; understand who you’re riding with and why

Selfishly, I run a video software company myself, so I’m obviously an advocate for brands upping their investment in video. But it’s vital that businesses think critically about the data coming to market on video consumption trends, especially on mobile. It’s undeniable that consumer video — entertainment content on YouTube and Facebook — is primarily mobile, but it’s very different for business-related videos on company websites. Taking time of day into consideration, we can assume these people are viewing videos from the office, most likely for professional reasons — think product demos, customer support, training and so on. With viewing habits such as these, you have more flexibility with your video content to capture the attention of your audience, and you should take advantage of that opportunity. Video for mobile On the flip side, videos viewed on mobile tend to take place later at night and have a shorter viewing duration, averaging around 68 seconds, according to the same Chartbeat data. Taking the time to plan a strategic approach will not only make your videos more valuable to consumers but will also drive success and help prove the business value. Some opinions expressed in this article may be those of a guest author and not necessarily Marketing Land. If you're looking to feed your obsession with SEO and SEM, then make it a priority to attend SMX West in March. Past attendees rave about SMX West, and so will you!

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Visual content is on the rise as consumers become more hungry for content that’s easy to digest. Cisco anticipates nearly 80 percent of all global web traffic will come from video in 2019, which should make it an integral part of every business’s marketing strategy.

Selfishly, I run a video software company myself, so I’m obviously an advocate for brands upping their investment in video. But it’s vital that businesses think critically about the data coming to market on video consumption trends, especially on mobile.

It’s undeniable that consumer video — entertainment content on YouTube and Facebook — is primarily mobile, but it’s very different for business-related videos on company websites.

Not all video is created equal

The average daily time spent on mobile in the US will almost double its desktop counterpart by 2017, according to data from ComScore, Nielsen and ZenithOptimedia. Yet, reports like these often don’t distinguish between videos for consumers’ enjoyment and those for businesses to acquire leads, educate their market and so on.

We recently looked at one million videos on our own platform, which is for business video almost exclusively, and studied the consumption trends of a random sample of 400,000 views from the past six months to date.

We found that while mobile views are certainly increasing, it’s at a much slower pace than other data has shown, with 80 percent of business video consumption happening on desktop and 20 percent occurring on mobile today, compared to 83 percent on desktop and 17 percent on mobile six months ago.

Mobile video consumption is on the rise, but businesses can’t afford to forget about desktop viewers of their video content. Desktop and mobile are both incredibly valuable, but the value to a specific brand — or even a specific campaign — depends on variables such as who you’re targeting and what your goals are.

Video for…

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