How Video Rankings Differ on Google and YouTube [New Study]

How Video Rankings Differ on Google and YouTube [New Study]

How Video Rankings Differ on Google and YouTube [New Study]. Now, many video marketers will want to read all 3,184 words of the post on the Stone Temple Digital Marketing Excellence Blog, which is entitled, “Ranking Videos on Google and YouTube: Study Shows How They Differ.” It was written by Eric Enge, the founder and CEO of Stone Temple. Here are my questions and his answers: Video Rankings on YouTube and Google Greg Jarboe: Were you surprised by the data that shows just how different the YouTube and Google algorithms for ranking videos are, or did you suspect that and collect the data to confirm your suspicions? Eric Enge: I did suspect that there was a difference. GJ: In your blog post about your findings, you say, “What users expect on YouTube vs. Google Search is different.” What additional data did you find that shows some of the reasons for those differences? As a result, the YouTube algorithm is oriented around videos where people tend to watch the entire video, and then maybe even watch more videos. Here is part one, which is designed to establish the relevance of the content: Pick a descriptive file name for the video. Part two is designed to drive the Total Watch Time for your video, and do that, you should: Feature the video in a blog post and embed it there. Then, the optimization process is pretty straightforward: Provide Google with strong relevance signals. I.e., pay attention to Part 1 of the YouTube optimization checklist above, as that list is important to Google, too.

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Over the years, a lot of my clients and students have asked, “Why don’t videos rank the same on Google and YouTube?” Well, a new study by Stone Temple Consulting, an award-winning digital marketing agency, not only discloses some critical data about how video rankings differ on Google and YouTube, but also shares its strategic insights about the data to provide the reasons for those differences. And, for video marketers looking for tactical advice, Stone Temple provides a couple of short, crisp checklists for YouTube video optimization and Google video optimization.

Now, many video marketers will want to read all 3,184 words of the post on the Stone Temple Digital Marketing Excellence Blog, which is entitled, “Ranking Videos on Google and YouTube: Study Shows How They Differ.” It was written by Eric Enge, the founder and CEO of Stone Temple. You also have the option of reading my interview with Enge, which appears below. And it’s only 1,154 words long. Or, heck, you can always do both. Here are my questions and his answers:

Video Rankings on YouTube and Google

Greg Jarboe: Were you surprised by the data that shows just how different the YouTube and Google algorithms for ranking videos are, or did you suspect that and collect the data to confirm your suspicions?

Eric Enge: I did suspect that there was a difference. It’s something that I had heard from others, but I saw that no one had ever done a study to document it, and I felt that digging it into it and documenting it in detail would help people better understand not only how different the algorithms are, but more about how they differ. That helps us better understand how to optimize for each of them.

GJ: In your blog post about your findings, you say, “What users expect on YouTube vs. Google Search is different.” What additional data did you find that shows some of the reasons for those differences?

EE: The first part of how their expectations differ is pretty straightforward. On YouTube, users expect videos, and nothing but videos. When they click on it, they plan to watch it right there. On Google, the user has asked a question and wants an answer. They don’t plan to stay on Google, they plan to leave it. Even in this age of instant answers, after they get their answers, they will probably leave and go somewhere else.

In addition, on Google, you can see that the great majority of the search results are traditional webpages. In the 424 search results we examined, only one had five videos on the top 100 of Google’s results, none had more than five…

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