Someone is fighting the House’s livestreaming ban one donation at a time

Someone is fighting the House's livestreaming ban one donation at a time. On the first day of the newest Congress, a new penalty went into effect: anyone livestreaming, recording, taping, photographing, or broadcasting anything from the House floor could face up to a $2,500 fine. Once the new fine was adopted Tuesday, a TV producer and self-described "newbie activist" in New York City decided this was effectively shutting down any sort of transparency between government proceedings and the public. In a phone call with Mashable Wednesday, Blaine (he asked to only use his first name) said he set up an online crowdfunding page and geared up to "shine light" on this fight. For Blaine, his "Freedom on the Floor" fundraiser is about "attention and reversal" of the new rule, which tacks on a fine to long-established rules prohibiting broadcasting and video recording on the House floor. "I would much rather see this reversed than for the next three years be paying John Lewis’ violation fines," he said. Image: AP Photo/Alex Brandon Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., after House Democrats ended their sit-in protest. The rule change stems from a 25-hour sit-in last June over gun control. "That was a pivotal moment for me," Blaine, 48, said about the June sit-in after the Pulse nightclub massacre. He said the money will go to candidates who are fined for violating the livestreaming rule.

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Members of the caucus head down the House steps after the House Democrats' sit-in ended.
Members of the caucus head down the House steps after the House Democrats’ sit-in ended.

On the first day of the newest Congress, a new penalty went into effect: anyone livestreaming, recording, taping, photographing, or broadcasting anything from the House floor could face up to a $2,500 fine.

Once the new fine was adopted Tuesday, a TV producer and self-described “newbie activist” in New York City decided this was effectively shutting down any sort of transparency between government proceedings and the public. In a phone call with Mashable Wednesday, Blaine (he asked to only use his first name) said he set up an online crowdfunding page and geared up to “shine light” on this fight.

For Blaine, his “Freedom on the Floor” fundraiser is about “attention and reversal” of the new rule, which tacks on a fine to long-established rules prohibiting broadcasting and video recording on the House floor. “I would much rather see this reversed than for the next three years be paying John Lewis’ violation fines,” he said.

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., after House Democrats ended their sit-in protest.

Image: AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Rep. John…

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