This Week in Content Marketing: The Business Case for Content Marketing as PR

In this episode, Robert and I discuss what happens when you rely too heavily on Facebook for content distribution. We also look at why GoPro closed its media division, and explore CNN’s partnership with a YouTube celeb to launch a new media property. Rants and raves include Breitbart.com and the business case for leveraging content marketing as public relations; we wrap up with an example of the week from UK National Trust. This week’s show (Recorded live on December 5, 2016; Length: 1:05:52) Download this week’s PNR This Old Marketing podcast. If you enjoy our PNR podcasts, we would love if you would rate it, or post a review, on iTunes. But two years after purchasing it, the Daily Mail has written down its entire investment in the New York-based start-up, according to Recode. Robert and I admire the audience-first content model Neistat seems to have used to achieve his success and think it would make a great case study on how to build a content brand, and then become a valuable product of it. Rants and raves (39:45) Robert’s rant-esque commentary: The Wall Street Journal brings us a compelling article that speaks to how controversial content network Breitbart monetizes its site traffic, and the confusion its ad technology has spurred among advertisers who weren’t aware their content would be appearing on the site. The article presents a thorough, compelling case for agencies to stop thinking about content as being separate from their account, strategy, and creative business if they want to remain competitive with publishers’ brand content studios. I recently discovered that, in addition to fundraising, the organization publishes National Trust Magazine, which goes out to its 4 million+ members three times a year – and happens to have the highest magazine circulation in Britain (according to Wikipedia).

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PNR: This Old Marketing with Joe Pulizzi and Robert Rose can be found on both iTunes and Stitcher.

In this episode, Robert and I discuss what happens when you rely too heavily on Facebook for content distribution. We also look at why GoPro closed its media division, and explore CNN’s partnership with a YouTube celeb to launch a new media property. Rants and raves include Breitbart.com and the business case for leveraging content marketing as public relations; we wrap up with an example of the week from UK National Trust.

This week’s show

(Recorded live on December 5, 2016; Length: 1:05:52)

Download this week’s PNR This Old Marketing podcast.

If you enjoy our PNR podcasts, we would love if you would rate it, or post a review, on iTunes.

1. Content marketing in the news

  • The Daily Mail takes a $31 million write-off on Facebook publisher fail (7:37): Elite Daily once cracked the code on using Facebook to generate clicks with high-volume, low-brow, dude-friendly content. But two years after purchasing it, the Daily Mail has written down its entire investment in the New York-based start-up, according to Recode. Robert suspects they are losing money because they are buying all their traffic; and I believe the lesson to be learned here is that you shouldn’t count on your rented traffic before it’s been reliably monetized.
  • GoPro cutting 15% of workforce, closes entertainment unit (18:05): Bloomberg Tech reports on the news that the action-camera maker is struggling to turn a profit and will shut down its entertainment division as a way to both reduce costs and refocus on its core business. What bothers me here is that the company doesn’t seem to have invested enough time in producing content to expect to see returns yet. Robert and I also wonder when the process of communicating with your customers and delivering value will start to be considered the “core” of a business’ operations.
  • How Casey Neistat used content marketing to make millions and then move on (27:03): The YouTube-famous video blogger has dropped the mic on his wildly popular vlog after his Beme app was acquired by CNN for a cool $25 million. According to this post on LinkedIn, Neistat’s decision to start a new media brand with the news net is a move to keep his work from getting stale, creatively. Robert and I admire the audience-first content model Neistat seems to have used to achieve his success and think it would make a great case study on how to build a content brand, and…

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