3 Ways a Virtual Reality Pioneer Is Rebranding the Form

3 Ways a Virtual Reality Pioneer Is Rebranding the Form

Dekker Dreyer was over it. Despite having produced high-impact VR experiences for Disturbed’s hit cover of "The Sound of Silence" and the groundbreaking VR film of their Live at Red Rocks album, he couldn’t shake the feeling that VR was getting stale when it should be at its most exciting. When Dreyer — a connoisseur of the form — found himself not wanting to experience what was being produced, he realized that others probably felt the same way: “The audience isn’t stupid, and they can tell that most of the content getting made is the afterthought of an ad agency with a little extra money to spend. We have an artistic medium that allows you to place yourself inside the experience of anyone or anything, any kind of world you can imagine, but here we are making impersonal, manufactured, and forgettable things. Dreyer’s work has always been a little dream-like, and he felt he was onto something, but he was still chasing the answer to how to “tell a story” in VR. That experience lead to Lucid, Dreyer’s latest project. “I decided to toss out any traditional structure and create a series of scenarios and worlds that are loosely connected around my own dreams,” he reveals. VR is going to explode when more artists get turned on to that. “It’s always hard to answer questions about the VR industry,” he says. It’s so new that people want to learn all about it, but I’m not sure the artists themselves have much to add to the conversation outside of what we’re specifically making.” 3.

How to Create a Content Marketing Strategy for Virtual Reality
4 Video Advertising Hacks Powerful Enough to Change Your Company
US Lags Behind Other Countries in Plans to Add Most Marketing Tech Tools
3 Ways a Virtual Reality Pioneer Is Rebranding the Form

Dekker Dreyer was over it. And in that moment, he saw an opportunity.

A pioneer in the virtual reality (VR) space, he realized the narrative around this specific niche of the film and entertainment world needed a reboot. Despite having produced high-impact VR experiences for Disturbed’s hit cover of “The Sound of Silence” and the groundbreaking VR film of their Live at Red Rocks album, he couldn’t shake the feeling that VR was getting stale when it should be at its most exciting.

When Dreyer — a connoisseur of the form — found himself not wanting to experience what was being produced, he realized that others probably felt the same way: “The audience isn’t stupid, and they can tell that most of the content getting made is the afterthought of an ad agency with a little extra money to spend. We have an artistic medium that allows you to place yourself inside the experience of anyone or anything, any kind of world you can imagine, but here we are making impersonal, manufactured, and forgettable things. I want to go places and see things that don’t exist in the physical world.”

Here are three ways Dreyer is doing just that.

1. Diving into its essence

Dreyer was on a mission to further his vision. “When someone finds out that I’m a VR creator,” he says, “they always say the same thing: ‘VR will be huge once someone figures out how to tell a story with it.’ I never really cared about the answer to that question, but so many people seemed to care so much that I felt I had to have something profound to tell them. Now I know it’s about a feeling, not a narrative.”

He recalls a recent experience that drove that point home:

One night I accidentally took too much melatonin. I was watching a show on Netflix called “The Toys That Made Us,” and as I turned my head away from the TV I saw a life-sized Skeletor toy sitting across…

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0