5 Simple Steps That Can Make You an Internet Celebrity

5 Simple Steps That Can Make You an Internet Celebrity. After working with thousands of social influencers and celebrities and learning the little secrets that make them stand out, I’m here to tell you that you can be just as successful. It’s January 2010, and 28-year-old Grace Atwood is working for an international beauty brand in a corporate role. Feeling stifled by her 9-to-5 life, she decides to start a blog as a creative outlet to share things she loves -- beauty products, DIY projects and lifestyle-oriented posts. “People don’t realize how much work it is,” Atwood says. What does it take to become a successful influencer? Related: The Secrets of the Woman Who Quit Her Job and Made Her Pug an Instagram Celebrity 2. Other examples of how this works vary from the biggest influencers in the world (Cameron Dallas, Nash Grier, et al.) to smaller influencers collaborating on Instagram -- the broader your network of collaborators, the more you’ll be exposed to new audiences and the stronger the social proof that you are in fact an influencer. Fake it 'til you make it. There is always a going trend, so make sure you contribute to it.

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5 Simple Steps That Can Make You an Internet Celebrity

Uploading a strategically-filtered selfie or a perfect plate of avocado toast has become a serious revenue source for influencers. Your food looks just as good, but nobody’s willing to pay you a dime? You’re doing it wrong — but it’s not too late. After working with thousands of social influencers and celebrities and learning the little secrets that make them stand out, I’m here to tell you that you can be just as successful.

It’s January 2010, and 28-year-old Grace Atwood is working for an international beauty brand in a corporate role. Feeling stifled by her 9-to-5 life, she decides to start a blog as a creative outlet to share things she loves — beauty products, DIY projects and lifestyle-oriented posts. Fast forward to the present, and Atwood’s blog The Stripe is her full-time job. As a microinfluencer based in New York City (she currently has over 88,000 followers on Instagram), Atwood has partnered with big-name brands including L’Oréal Paris, SK-II, Verizon and eBay to name a few.

Related: This Former Math Teacher Now Gets Paid to Travel the World and Take Pictures of Her Meals

“Never in my wildest dreams did I think I would make money from my blog, I just thought it was a fun place to share things after a long day at the office,” she says. It’s Atwood’s commitment to authenticity and legitimacy that has contributed to her success in an already saturated industry, affording her opportunities such as attending the 2017 SAG Awards with L’Oréal Paris, and visiting fashion brand Saint James’ factory in Normandy, France.

Perks and experiences such as these spur many millennials to pursue a career as an influencer. And while the benefits seem endless (Atwood told me that having the autonomy to work for herself is by far the best), it’s not as glamorous as it looks on your Instagram feed. “People don’t realize how much work it is,” Atwood says. “There are so many different platforms, you have to reply to everyone’s comments and there’s pressure to project a perfect life. Last week I had strep throat, but I was posting pictures on the beach and in SoHo looking perfectly put together. It’s a lot of work and people don’t realize that.”

Related: How This Former Personal Assistant Used Instagram to Turn Her Love of Flowers Into a Blooming Business

My conversation with Atwood made me think about the days when you could hire a certain famous family to attend your events for $5,000 a pop, and they’d throw in the two…

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