eSUB Construction Software raises $5 million to help subcontractors track jobs and get paid

A San Diego startup called eSUB Construction Software has raised $5 million in a Series A round led by Revolution Ventures according to President and CEO Wendy Rogers. The company’s cloud-based project management apps help subcontractors track and get compensated for all the work they do on construction jobs. Rogers said, “There’s a saying that subcontractors get paid for the work they report not the work they do. That experience inspired her to start eSUB in 2008. Her detailed knowledge of the way that subcontractors complete jobs was a key factor that led Revolution to back eSUB, according to a partner with the firm, Bobby Ocampo. The investor said, “Incumbent software providers in construction and real estate like Procore are serving the high-end of the market. But the people out doing the work in the field, the subcontractors, have such different workflows and concerns. A vast majority of people working on the subcontractor side are not used to enterprise software, so you have to have a product that’s very easy to use, especially on mobile.” According to research by Sage Construction & Real Estate, and by Gartner, the construction industry spends the least on IT of all other major industries in the U.S. The company plans to expand from about 50 employees today to about 100 over the next year, hiring especially in its product and software engineering, customer support and sales and marketing roles, Wagner said. Featured Image: eSUB Inc.

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A San Diego startup called eSUB Construction Software has raised $5 million in a Series A round led by Revolution Ventures according to President and CEO Wendy Rogers.

The company’s cloud-based project management apps help subcontractors track and get compensated for all the work they do on construction jobs.

Rogers said, “There’s a saying that subcontractors get paid for the work they report not the work they do. And most people outside of the industry don’t realize this but it’s subcontractors who do about 99% of the work in construction, not general contractors.”

Construction work can shift over time requiring additional labor, materials and expertise to deal with weather, project delays and changes due to discoveries on site, or design decisions that come from architects and general contractors.

Rogers previously managed a consultancy representing and advocating for subcontractors in the massive U.S. construction market where disputes over payment are frequent. That experience inspired her to start eSUB in 2008.

Her detailed knowledge of the way that subcontractors complete jobs was a key factor that led Revolution to back eSUB, according…

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