How the murder of a Russian official went massively viral on Facebook

How the murder of a Russian official went massively viral on Facebook. Warning: This post contains a graphic image that some readers may find disturbing. That one AP post reached nine million people just six hours after it was published, according to internal metrics shared with Mashable. The photo, as of the publishing of this article, had been shared over 45,000 times, with 5,600 comments and 28,000 "reactions" — which refer to various uses of the Like button. (The nine million people reached by the post refers to the number of users who scrolled past the content in their Facebook feeds, perhaps because it was shared by their friends.) A representative for NewsWhip, a data analytics service that tracks viral content, told Mashable that the photo post had 175 times the average engagement for the AP Images page. "Because of Facebook's algorithm that favors content shared by users over publishers and brands, more people are likely to see the photo in their News Feed. Despite its obvious role in distributing news, the company has consistently refused to acknowledge its responsibility as a media company, though last week it announced partnerships with third-party fact-checkers to battle the spread of "disputed" information on its platform. "Fake news" is spreading. Facebook let it stand, and then the site did its thing, spreading information across an intricate network of connected "friends" scrolling through their News Feeds.

How to Use Memes to Attract More Attention Online
See Competitors Ads on Facebook and Twitter
7 Social Media Marketing Tactics That Work
A man identified as Mevlut Mert Altintas holds up a gun after shooting Andrey Karlov, the Russian Ambassador to Turkey, at a photo gallery in Ankara, Turkey.
A man identified as Mevlut Mert Altintas holds up a gun after shooting Andrey Karlov, the Russian Ambassador to Turkey, at a photo gallery in Ankara, Turkey.

Warning: This post contains a graphic image that some readers may find disturbing.

If you have an iconic image on your hands, forget the front page: You’re posting it on Facebook.

That’s exactly what the Associated Press did Monday, shortly after the assassination of Andrey G. Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey. A young man shot the official to death at an art exhibit in Ankara, and the AP’s Burhan Ozbilici captured the entire violent incident.

Less than two hours after the news broke, the AP’s official account for images on Facebook shared a photograph of the gunman, arm raised in triumph, standing over Karlov’s body.

It spread rapidly, proving for the umpteenth time Facebook’s incredible influence over how we receive information. That one AP post reached nine million people just six hours after it was published, according to internal metrics shared with Mashable.

The photo, as of the publishing of this article, had been shared over 45,000 times, with 5,600 comments and 28,000 “reactions” — which refer to various uses of the Like button.

Lauren Easton, AP’s director of media relations, told Mashable that the AP Images page had amassed more than 21,000 new followers Monday — its total currently rests at just over 331,000. (The nine million people reached by the post refers to the number of users who scrolled past the content in their Facebook feeds, perhaps because it was shared by their friends.)

A representative for NewsWhip, a data analytics service that tracks viral content, told Mashable that the photo post had 175 times the average engagement…

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0