Facebook Isn’t Enough: Use These 4 Social Strategies If You Want to Reach Generation Z

Facebook Isn’t Enough: Use These 4 Social Strategies If You Want to Reach Generation Z

This means the 70 million companies using Facebook to reach moms and dads need a different social strategy to engage their Generation Z offspring. Members of this generation live on social media, so they’re quick to cut the noise and never look back. The marketers using them should create relevant, compelling content that adds value at every turn, fits the social platform itself, and doesn’t feel out of place on curated social feeds. Brands that can react swiftly to new preferences will be more readily accepted into a Gen Zer’s daily life. Accept that all the old social media techniques you used to woo consumers just won’t work with this young, tech-minded population in the same way. Gen Zers are unlike any generation we’ve ever seen, and they’re definitely different than the Millennials who came before them. You can even create influencers within your business. Talk with Gen Zers — not at them. You don’t have to be perfect, but you should study their preferences rather than just assuming they’ll go along with what you’ve done for years. After all, we’ve adjusted to new generations for 40 years to better engage with them, and we’ve never looked back.

Workplace by Facebook begins to take shape
5 Fantastic Examples of CEOs and Marketers Who Averted Potential PR Disasters
Marketers Get Ready: WhatsApp Ads Are on the Way

Parents might be all over Facebook, but their children aren’t following suit. This means the 70 million companies using Facebook to reach moms and dads need a different social strategy to engage their Generation Z offspring. Members of this generation were born between the mid-’90s and 2000s, and they’re shaking up the social media game.

Why do roughly half of Gen Zers shy away from Facebook? They’re not trying to buck the system or rage against the machine. In truth, their generation never really adopted Facebook in the first place, and this stems from their upbringing. Gen Zers are part of the first generation to use technology as a tool and not a toy, and they crave a private, moderated experience. They’re especially fond of visually compelling platforms where they can watch and discover, as 71 percent of teenagers dedicate at least three hours a day to watching videos.

Members of Gen Z also favor curation: They’re happiest when they can let in what they want and filter out the rest. This is why you’ll see more teens and tweens active on Snapchat and Instagram than, say, Facebook or Twitter.

It’s not that Facebook is bad — it’s just not where Gen Zers go to relax, socialize, or learn. Companies that want to connect with this new generation will need to cater to their preferences and treat them as the creative, intelligent individuals they are.

Branding for the Next Generation

Like all emerging generations, Gen Z is incredibly influential to society and family life. No fewer than 70 percent of Gen Zers gently push their parents into purchases, and this means that businesses should start conversations early and often to maximize their efforts. The catch? They have to get their message right the first time.

Although a good chunk of Gen Z communication is digital, organizations can’t assume that marketing to their group online is always a slam dunk. Members of this generation live on social media, so they’re quick to cut the noise and never look back. It’s hard to find middle ground.

Companies can’t simply buy ads on social platforms that Gen Zers favor and forget about them, either. Marketing on Instagram and Snapchat requires a different approach than other platforms. The marketers using them should create relevant, compelling content that adds value at…

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0