How You Can Use Quora as a Marketing Tool: It’s Not Just for Personal Questions Anymore

How You Can Use Quora as a Marketing Tool: It’s Not Just for Personal Questions Anymore

What if you could tap into it to build an audience, thereby increasing your number of followers and ultimately streamlining your business or brand? According to Hanson Cheng, an American videographer who at one point got over 1 million views on Quora in under 45 days, questions found on Quora can prompt entrepreneurs to write responses showcasing what they know and/or care about in a clear-sighted way. "It was my way of finding out what people were interested in learning about and whether any of my experiences could help them." Clearly, Cheng had his own goal in mind, and it extended beyond just providing readers with potential solutions to their problems, “When I started testing Quora, I wanted to see if I could grow my Instagram account," he said. “Once you know your goal, you can reverse-engineer the structure of your answers to get them to act,” Cheng said. An example of that is choosing the most time-effective questions you'll answer. Copywriting for for your call to action What you write about is just as important as how you write about it, and when it comes to giving answers to someone’s questions, the post has to be engaging (read: “structured”). If you do that, it’s an even better idea to plug a link to your favorite social media handle in case readers want to find out more about you. Your main goal is to provide an answer, not to create more questions. As Cheng put it, “The only thing I do is focus on writing quality answers to great questions.

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You can tap into one of the fastest-growing Q&A websites to connect your brand with relevant traffic.

How You Can Use Quora as a Marketing Tool: It's Not Just for Personal Questions Anymore

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Questions are the seed of human knowledge: If it weren’t for the classic questions “What if I do this?” or “How can I do that?” we wouldn’t be where we are now. So it is natural that, with the development of technology and the democratization of the internet, people have more access to answers than ever before, which in turn increases their thirst to question.

And that’s an important consideration because questions are sustainable; we’ll never run out of them; and everyone’s got at least one. That is why user-run Q&A platforms like Quora (“a place to gain and share knowledge”) pop up at the top of so many Google searches.

Although science and mysticism can be used to tackle most of our doubts, sometimes all we want is another human being (preferably one with firsthand experience in our chposen topic) to show the way; that’s the humanistic aspect which makes Quora so popular. Like Wikipedia, Quora relies on and is propelled by the sharing of communal knowledge, allowing anyone who has a thorough understanding of a subject (a quality unfortunately rare sometimes) to contribute to the collection and curation of free-access information.

Unlike Wikipedia, however, Quora’s multidirectional internal mechanisms — which join users with topics, users with users and questions with questions –, make the entire experience more dynamic and trustworthy.

But what if beyond personal questions, you could use Quora professionally, incorporating it as an actual tool into your business marketing approach? What if you could tap into it to build an audience, thereby increasing your number of followers and ultimately streamlining your business or brand?

According to Hanson Cheng, an American videographer who at one point got over 1 million views on Quora in under 45 days, questions found on Quora can prompt entrepreneurs to write responses showcasing what they know and/or care about in a clear-sighted way. “Quora seemed like a great way to flesh out my ideas to create content,” Cheng told me in an interview. “It was my way of finding out what people were interested in learning about and whether any of my experiences could help them.”

Clearly, Cheng had his own goal in mind, and it extended beyond just providing readers with potential solutions to their problems, “When I started testing Quora, I wanted to see if I could grow my Instagram account,” he said. “In under two months, I was able to grow my account from 2,000 to a little over 4,000.”

Besides boosting his number of followers, Cheng said he increased his revenue, acquired a…

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