Sorry, Black Friday — social media hates you

Sorry, Black Friday — social media hates you. A Black Friday shopper, most likely tweeting about how much he hates Black Friday. In the early hours of Nov. 25 (and in some cases, the evening hours after Thanksgiving dinner on Nov. 24), millions of Americans will embark on Black Friday odysseys, questing for the doorbuster deals and backroom specials that whip the shopping public into a frenzy year after year. According to the research, a bulk of the online conversations revolving around Black Friday last year focused on anger, sadness, fear and despair — not necessarily the feel good vibes retailers aim for. Image: crimson hexagon Sentiment wasn't always so bleak. About one-third of Black Friday posts in 2015 were positive and nearly 40 percent are negative. Image: crimson hexagon As a proportion of the overall Twitter dialogue, Black Friday has fallen from a massively trending topic to a blip on the radar. The research shows that the negative posts often stick to the same script. Image: crimson hexagon With jam-packed stores and sometimes questionable "deals," there's bound to be some complaints. If you venture out, be careful not to rub anyone out there the wrong way.

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A Black Friday shopper, most likely tweeting about how much he hates Black Friday.
A Black Friday shopper, most likely tweeting about how much he hates Black Friday.

In the early hours of Nov. 25 (and in some cases, the evening hours after Thanksgiving dinner on Nov. 24), millions of Americans will embark on Black Friday odysseys, questing for the doorbuster deals and backroom specials that whip the shopping public into a frenzy year after year.

And if recent research on social media trends holds any truth, they’ll likely be hating every moment of it.

Social media intelligence tracker Crimson Hexagon analyzed millions of social posts between 2010 and 2015 to understand how changes in the retail industry are affecting Black Friday participation and perception among consumers.

According to the research, a bulk of the online conversations revolving around Black Friday last year focused on anger, sadness, fear and despair — not necessarily the feel good vibes retailers aim for.

Image: crimson hexagon

Sentiment wasn’t always so bleak. Back in 2010, more than half of the posts observed were positive in nature, and only 20 percent were deemed negative. Five years later,…

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