3 Tools to Optimize Your Old Content to Build More Organic Search Traffic

3 Tools to Optimize Your Old Content to Build More Organic Search Traffic

It analyzes Google or Bing search result pages, extracts common terms, and uses semantic analysis to provide a list of topics and keywords you should use to make your old content more relevant to the given query: You don’t need to optimize the old content around all these terms. Keyword gap research works best for pages that already perform well for some queries but not necessarily the same queries your competitors rank for. One of the most useful sections is the “searches related to” box that shows related queries. Featured Snippet Tool (developed by the company I work for) collects and organizes “searches related to” keywords for queries your page already ranks for (pricing starts at $99/month). What to do with all those new keywords Using the three tools above, you’ll end up with a solid list of new related keywords to include in your old content. Make sure the updated live page is optimized for both search engines and the (mobile) user experience. And read this article on what can be preventing your page from ranking higher to make sure yours is good to go. Are you using any other tools to optimize your existing content? Feel free to include additional tools in the comments. Ann blogs about search and social media industry trends and content marketing tools.

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You spent hours (and maybe days) creating that content. It enjoyed solid exposure when it first went live but, months later, it’s neglected and almost ignored.

How can you put that old content to better use? Reoptimize it.

Reoptimizing your old content has two important benefits:

  • Accumulated backlinks will make benefitting from your reoptimizing efforts – through improved rankings – quicker and easier.
  • Revisiting the old content creates an opportunity to refresh it by removing outdated data and adding something new.

I suggest using a mix of criteria to identify existing pages worthy of reoptimizing:

  • Pages with outdated content (old data, discontinued tools, etc.) that still receive clicks. You don’t want your readers to leave. Edit the page to ensure its accuracy and optimize again based on its new performance.
  • Pages slowly increasing or decreasing in organic traffic. Recognize the signals to diversify the rankings and readdress your organic competition or reinforce growth by better optimizing the page.
  • Pages stuck on page two of Google search results. It should be easier to move a page from two to one in search results than it is to go from page 10 to page one. An article showing up on page 2 likely just needs a bit more work.

Once you’ve chosen the pages to work on, these tools can help.

1. Text Optimizer: Include related keywords and concepts

I’ve written about how Google’s algorithm evolution is getting smarter every year. The good news is you can learn from it and adapt your copy accordingly.

Google’s algorithm generates snippets based on the excerpts from each page it finds that best relate to the query.

You can analyze those search snippets and extract related terms and concepts.

TextOptimizer (free and paid versions) does that for you. It analyzes Google or Bing search result pages, extracts common terms, and uses semantic analysis to provide a list of topics and keywords you should use to make your old content more relevant to the given query:

You don’t need to optimize the old content around all these terms. Try incorporating a set of 15 into your content, then run the tool to see how it improves your score. Repeat the process until the content scores 90 or higher.

The tool also gives editorial suggestions, i.e., popular questions around your topic that will help you build a more in-depth copy. If any of those questions are relevant to your old content, incorporate the answers into it.

Text Optimizer can operate as a Google Chrome extension, making it easier to access and run your pages through it.

2. Serpstat: Research keyword gaps

Keyword gap research is a relatively new tactic allowing you to discover which keywords your competitors rank for while your page is nowhere to be found.

Keyword gap research works best for pages that already perform well for some queries but not necessarily the same queries your competitors rank for.

To look at content gaps on a page:

The tool (which offers limited results free, with paid plans starting at $19/month) checks the well-performing keywords for your URL as well as those…

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