Comparing Video Production Companies (& How They Impact Project Cost)

Comparing Video Production Companies (& How They Impact Project Cost)

In general, you have four options when producing video: Internal/Intern Solo Videographer Video Production Company Ad Agency I’m going to walk you through the differences of each video production option and how the variables affect the cost and the quality. The goal is to help you see the progression of quality as the number of video professionals increase. So, let’s see how many people it takes to produce your video. Here are your options: Option 1: Intern or internal employee Number of professionals required: Zero Costs: Low (Possibly under $500 – depending on employee salary) Quality: Suspect More and more companies are exploring the option of using staff to produce videos. Usually, you’ll use an employee for the on-camera talent. Webcast, December 12th: Why Automating Your Cold Calls is the Best-Kept Secret for Driving, Qualifying, and Closing More Leads at Scale Option 3: Video Production Company Number of professionals: 2+ Costs: $5,000 – $50,000 Quality: High When production value is important, it’s time to reach out to a professional video production company. As I mentioned, the number of video professionals required to complete the project determines video cost. At a minimum, a video production company will provide you a videographer and a producer/director. Watch an Example Here is an example of a training video that was produced by a video production company. All in all, this is a well-produced video.

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How many people does it take to produce a video? This is a great question. The costs and quality of your video will vary depending on the number of professionals needed to complete your project.

Some people will tell you length is the largest determining factor when it comes to the cost of a video but I’m here to tell you that’s not the case.

In general, you have four options when producing video:

  • Internal/Intern
  • Solo Videographer
  • Video Production Company
  • Ad Agency

I’m going to walk you through the differences of each video production option and how the variables affect the cost and the quality.

In a previous blog, I talked about my inadequacies when it comes to fixing my lawnmower. For this post, I’m going to compare a few more videos in the lawn mowing industry to show you the pros and cons of each option.

The goal is to help you see the progression of quality as the number of video professionals increase. So, let’s see how many people it takes to produce your video. Here are your options:

Option 1: Intern or internal employee

Number of professionals required: Zero
Costs: Low (Possibly under $500 – depending on employee salary)
Quality: Suspect

More and more companies are exploring the option of using staff to produce videos. Let’s face it, people have grown up with video and many tinker with video on the side. So, there’s a good chance someone on your staff has the desire and maybe even the ability to produce your video.

Often, this approach meets the needs of the company, especially if it’s an internal training or simple message from the CEO.

While it might appear you are saving money, this decision often comes at the cost of employee productivity. While professionals cost a lot more per hour to produce videos, they are faster and more efficient.

What could take a professional 5 hours to produce, could take a non-professional employee five to ten times longer to complete. You must weigh this cost when deciding whether to use your internal staff. Is it worth it to remove your employee from their regular tasks?

Watch an Example

Here is an example of a video shot by a non-professional. It gives you the intended info but is fairly rudimentary. It accomplishes its goal but is not broadcast quality by any means.

Option 2: Solo Videographer

Number of professionals required: One
Costs: $500 – $5,000
Quality: Decent but room for improvement

A good way to keep costs down but bump up your production value is to reach out to the independent videographer, often known as the one-person-band.

This person does it all: shoot, write, edit, graphics, etc. However, the phrase, “Jack of all trades, master of none” comes to mind.

Often, the lone videographer is excellent at some tasks like shooting or audio but might lack skills in editing or writing….

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