Live Video Strategy: How to Create a Show That Engages

Live Video Strategy: How to Create a Show That Engages. Do your weekly show on the same day at the same time. Obviously, you can’t pre-record a live show. You can use level 3 or 4 gear for this part of the strategy. Sharing who you are turns your audience into a loyal viewer base. At first, do a life stream two times a week. Do a fun mobile stream where you talk about something, either leading up to your weekly show or offering a behind-the-scenes look at something. Listen to the show to hear about my experience with life streams and Social Media Examiner’s weekly live show. To help you manage this aspect of live video, Luria shares her formula for the flow of a live video show. Get people to comment, share, and engage, so Facebook shows your video to more people.

14 Reasons Your Business Desperately Needs a Content Marketing Strategy
5 Content Marketing Ideas for July 2017
5 Ways Marketers Can Gain an Edge With Machine Learning

Interested in broadcasting live video?

Have you considered starting a live video show?

To explore how to create a successful live video show, I interview Luria Petrucci.

More About This Show

The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It’s designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing.

In this episode, I interview Luria Petrucci, a live video expert. She’s the host of Live Streaming Pros, a live show dedicated to helping businesses produce professional live streams. She’s helped big brands such as AT&T and Panasonic, and influencers such as Michael Hyatt, Amy Porterfield, and Pat Flynn.

Luria explores four levels of broadcasting equipment.

You’ll discover how to create an engaging flow for your live show.

Live Video Strategy: How to Create a Show That Engages featuring insights from Luria Petrucci on the Social Media Marketing Podcast.
Live Video Strategy: How to Create a Show That Engages featuring insights from Luria Petrucci on the Social Media Marketing Podcast.

Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below.

Listen Now

Listen now: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 42:18 — 39.1MB)

Here are some of the things you’ll discover in this show:

Live Video Strategy

Luria’s Story

Luria got started with video in 2005. She was one of the first video podcasters to create content for the video iPod. (This was before the iPhone and long before YouTube “became a thing.”) Shortly thereafter, Luria started doing live video, too. By 2007, she was live-streaming from a professional studio and from mobile devices and began learning how live video creates a connection with her audience. Ever since, she’s been doing a weekly or daily show.

Before Periscope and Facebook Live, Luria’s live-streaming tech included a NewTek TriCaster and Ustream. She also did some YouTube. Justin.tv (which is now Twitch) and Livestream were the other early platforms, although they focused more on business. Although Ustream focuses more on businesses now, it concentrated on creators back then.

Luria enjoys seeing other people getting excited about going live, because she’s believed in live video for so long.

Luria enjoys seeing other people getting excited about going live.
Luria enjoys seeing other people getting excited about going live.

She says live video creates a strong relationship with her audience and is the reason her audience has stuck with her for 11 years through massive business changes, partnership changes, and all of the hard stuff that goes on in business. People tell her they’ve been watching her since day one. (Note: Back then, Luria was known as Cali Lewis.)

Listen to the show to discover what tech Luria used in the early days, as well as what live video was like at the beginning.

Why Consider Live Video

Live video is the best marketing conversion tool Luria has ever seen because of its impact. When people are watching you on live video, they know you’re not faking it. When you’re selling something or trying to lead people into a funnel, live video is easy because of what Luria calls the “conversational call to action.”

Like most people, Luria has a hard time selling. People don’t like to sell because they don’t like to be sold to. The conversational call to action is really about helping people. You’re letting them know you’re there for them and will take care of them. When you offer something in a live video, it’s easier to sell it because you’re not really selling. When somebody asks a question, your answer proves the value of your products or services.

Also, although the excitement for and accessibility of live video is new, its formulas and structure are proven.

Listen to the show to hear what I love about live video.

The Four Levels of Live Video Gear

Luria explains what gear you need for live video in four levels.

Luria breaks gear requirements down into four levels.
Luria breaks down gear requirements into four levels.

She calls level 1 the “selfie stream.” You hold your mobile phone in your hand and the live video is raw, up-close, and personal.

For level 2, add some gear to your mobile phone such as a microphone, video stabilizer, and a light. This gear adds a little polish to your video and removes the shakiness.

Level 3 is going live from a computer with software like Wirecast.

Finally, level 4 is for TV-quality video. Your gear includes a dedicated machine in a studio and a setup that produces a high-quality stream.

Listen to the show to hear Luria discuss the roots of live video.

Luria’s Live Video Strategy

Part 1 of Luria’s live video strategy is consistency. You want to tell your audience you’re there for them every single week. When you make that commitment to them, they’ll make that commitment to you. Plus, people have a lot to pay attention to, so if you’re not in their face all the time, they’ll forget about you.

Luria recommends starting with a weekly show. A monthly show is doable, but it’s not really enough to be consistent. You don’t want to go daily, unless you’ve done weekly for a while, because daily is really hard to keep up. Do your weekly show on the same day at the same time.

Commit to to a day and time for a weekly show.
Commit to a day and time for a weekly show.

The best time to go live is what works best for you and your schedule. Obviously, you can’t pre-record a live show. If you commit to a time that’s not good for…

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0