You Might Find Your Next Employee (or Job) on Facebook

You Might Find Your Next Employee (or Job) on Facebook

You Might Find Your Next Employee (or Job) on Facebook. Last week, Facebook announced the ability to post, and look for, jobs. Clearly, the first competitor potentially affected by the move, LinkedIn, comes to mind. But should the network be really worried? Arguably, Facebook added the new feature to help small businesses and make Facebook their platform of choice. To harness the power of Facebook job listings, businesses will most likely need to pay to promote these openings. So, the question naturally comes up, how much information will potential employers be able to see? Clearly, potential employers can see your profile picture and approximate your age based on a photo on any network. Time will tell whether Facebook made the right move. What’s clear now is that the network continues to blur the lines between personal and professional, and makes the competition in the social network industry ever-so-tougher.

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You Might Find Your Next Employee (or Job) on Facebook

Last week, Facebook announced the ability to post, and look for, jobs. Available in the United States and Canada at this point in time, business pages can now list their job openings and hiring managers can track applications and contact potential employees.

Plus, users who are deemed to be a good fit by Facebook will see the job listing in their Newsfeed. If they choose to apply, the process is very simple; a window that looks like a lead form will pop up with some information already pre-populated.

Clearly, the first competitor potentially affected by the move, LinkedIn, comes to mind. But should the network be really worried? The answer — as with most things in life — is “yes and no.” While LinkedIn clearly doesn’t boast the same numbers of monthly active users, the two networks actually go after different audiences. Quartz goes really deep into statistics on the difference of skills and competency levels in the two markets, but the bottom line is: LinkedIn is mostly used by white-collar college-educated people, whereas Facebook will be going after blue-collar workers with some college or a high school diploma. Plus, Facebook’s tool is oriented primarily at small businesses that might be looking to employ part-timers.

Nevertheless, the new feature will have a huge impact on the social industry. Facebook is pretty much on the forefront of innovation, whether through acquisition or cloning popular features. So, their every move is being closely watched by their competition. A few concerns instantly come to mind.

One-stop shop experience

It’s no secret that Facebook tries very hard to keep its impressive user base from leaving for newer, trendier platforms. Facebook combines abilities to post short personal updates and photos, to broadcast live videos, to share disappearing messages, to catch on…

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