8+ Tools to Find Related Keywords for Your Content

8+ Tools to Find Related Keywords for Your Content. But to really write smart copy, you should look at terms related to what you are targeting and how Google associates those terms. And we bring in SEO by determining which related terms Google expects to see on a page that can ultimately help your content rank better. Google AdWords Keyword Planner (free) Google Keyword Planner often is one of the first places many SEO professionals start their keyword research, but it also can help you look at how Google is grouping keywords. Type a high-level term to see related topics that align with your original topic. For example, “18-inch doll accessories” shows categories like easy DIY, free pattern, how to make, products, etc. For example, type in “golf.” You see a list of keywords that relate to how consumers are searching for that term on Google. But looking through Google Correlate can help generate a list of semantically related terms to try and include in your content. Then click on related topics. Incorporating semantically related terms into your copy Once you’ve done your research using one or more of these tools, you have an idea of terms that might make sense from a keyword perspective to pull into your copy.

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“Write for the user, not the search engines,” continues to be a mantra of content marketing. In reality, smart content creators write for both.

Quality content is interesting, informative, original, AND it includes keywords, ultimately leading to more visits and helping you achieve your why. Quality content naturally builds links, which improves the site authority, which in turn boosts rankings, and gets more eyeballs on your content.

Integrating SEO with your content is the first step. But to really write smart copy, you should look at terms related to what you are targeting and how Google associates those terms. Then incorporate those terms into your content. Or you can use those findings to identify related topics you may want to write about down the road.

What is semantically related?

From a high level, semantics looks at the meaning behind words. By taking a semantically related view, we look at the relationship between words. Applying this concept to content marketing, we talk about the types of keywords and phrases typically used when writing about a topic. And we bring in SEO by determining which related terms Google expects to see on a page that can ultimately help your content rank better.

Let’s give an example. Say you are writing an article about the best running shoes for women. You do your research process and select your keywords. But what other words are semantically related to “best running shoes for women”?

As you scan the content ranking for that phrase on the first search engine results page (SERP), you notice a lot of similar language in the more detailed descriptions – comfortable, miles, track, treadmill, trails, lifestyle, 5K, marathon, etc.

semantically-related

While you can do this process manually (as Rand Fishkin outlined in a Whiteboard Friday episode), you can also find semantically related terms using various tools to help you gain efficiencies.

Google AdWords Keyword Planner (free)

Google Keyword Planner often is one of the first places many SEO professionals start their keyword research, but it also can help you look at how Google is grouping keywords.

TIP: Google ties its Keyword Planner to your Google account so you need to log in to access the planner.

Here’s an example. You’re writing about hamburger recipes. You type “hamburger recipes” into the keyword planner and get a variety of keyword ideas. Click on the Ad Group Ideas tab to view terms related to hamburger recipes by related term groups – easy, best, beef, meat, meal, ideas, patty, simple, gourmet, and quick. Click on a group to drill down to more related terms.

google-adworks-keyword-planner

Pinterest (free)

Pinterest is a hidden gem for helping you understand semantically related terms and topics. Type a high-level term to see related topics that align with your original topic.

For example, type “dolls” and you’ll see specific brand names (American Girl and Barbie). You’ll also see costumes, makeup, clothes, house, and DIY. Types of dolls (porcelain, handmade, vintage, etc.) are also grouped by categories. You’ll also see industry jargon such as BJD (ball-jointed dolls).

pinterest-semantically-related-terms

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